Out of MtLawleyShire: Kings Park #3 – Trees

The real wonder of Kings Park is not the gorgeousness of the wildflowers – the beauty of Kings Park are its trees.  I took quite a few photos, because I cannot resist trees and these are some of the most beautiful in the whole city (she says, having not really been everywhere…)

But I know some of you (and Bulldog in particular) will enjoy this post.

They are everywhere, the trees – viewed through a Victorian era tea pavilion to the city beyond

trees_3  trees_4

Magnificent and ancient conifers:

trees_5  trees_6

trees_8  trees_7

trees_9  trees_10

trees_37  

Trees frame the city:

trees_12  trees_17

trees_13  trees_18

trees_33  trees_221

 

Flowering bottlebrush look beautiful against massed greens

trees_14  trees_15

trees_16  trees_36

The occasional oak in new bright green is startling against the more subtle blue-grey greens of native trees:

trees_11

trees_31  trees_35

 

especially in contrast with the always ancient looking peppermint trees – & this one tossing in the bright warm wind that day:

trees_32  trees_34

 

but the real beauties are the wonderful eucalypts,growing in natural settings throughout this ordered part of the park, backdrops to large lawned areas and planted areas of the Botanical gardens before the wilderness starts:

trees_24  trees_26

 

trees_25  trees_29

trees_28

trees_20

Along the edges of the cliff, framing views of the river:

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and these – grown in avenues along the road to commemorate fallen soldiers:

 

trees_23  trees_27

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trees_19  trees_22

trees_2

I love the trees, and wish I could’ve got better views of the avenues of tall trunks, white in the light.  But there was very heavy traffic, people everywhere.  Maybe when the school holidays are over…

I hope you enjoyed this last post from my visit to King’s Park 🙂

 

 

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Out of MtLawleyshire – Trees at Murdoch University & Matilda Bay

I have had a busy week and while there have been no sunset photos for the end of the week, there have been lots of trees.

It is Festival season in Perth, and within the Perth festival is the Writer’s Festival – & I am a writer, of sorts.  This year, I actually attended an event at the University fo Western Australia, but before that, I was invited to attend a Q&A with China Mieville at Murdoch University in the southern suburbs.  It was an excellent talk.  He’s a very articulate engaging character, which is to be expected from his books (my favourite is The City & The City).  But, though he would probably raise his eyebrows at this, it was also a chance to look at trees.

Murdoch University has wonderful native grounds, filled with mostly natives.  But not just trees – flowers:

Grevillea:

white grevillea_murdoch  grevillea_murdoch

This – so reminiscent of a flame tree flower, but it isn’t.  Glorious red 🙂

red flower_murdoch

Eucalypt blossom:

blossom_murdoch  blossom_murdoch_2

& the nuts they leave behind:

nuts_murdoch

Water lilies:

waterlilies_murdoch

& this

murdoch_bamboo baby

Grows into this:

murdoch_bamboo  murdoch_bamboo_1

Now the trees. I don’t know what this is, but its brilliant green is striking, and the duller yet graceful shape of a sheoak:

murdoch_brilliant green  murdoch_trees_2

Wonderful tree with almost furry bark:

murdoch_trees  trees_murdoch

Cape Lilac in the outside cafe:

cape lilac_murdoch  cape lilac_murdoch_2

These are just beautiful from various places around the campus:

murdoch_trees_1

grace_murdoch  above it all_murdoch

& this is the trunk of a massive tree:

massive_murdoch

Finally, two towering trees soaring into the inconstant, uneven sky of a terribly hot day threatening rain and delivering none:

tall_murdoch  matilda by_8

A plane tree in the city as I made my way home:

city plane tree

& this?  At the small park in West Perth just down from where I teach – a peppermint tree looking like a jungle unto itself:

peppermint tree jungle

Today, I attended a talk by China Mieville & the wonderful Margaret Atwood.  They played so well off each other, and Margaret Atwood is such a character – so sharp & funny & wonderfully subversive.  I love her writing, have heard her talk often and this was just as wonderful.  China Mieville was a wonderful partner for her.  Of course, with his genre writing, her novels Oyrx & Crake and After the Flood (as well as The Handmaid’s Tale)  were under discussion along with his novels  (& mention of  a book the talk reminded me of that I want to read for the PhD: Hoban’s Riddley Walker).

And although I had no time to wander along the river, everywhere you go around the University of Western Australia and Matilda Bay there are trees:

a Moreton Bay fig dappled in the inconstant sunlight today:

moreton bay fig_matilda bay

matilda bay_1 soaring_murdoch

A scribbly gum and another:

matilda bay_5  matilda bay_4

just trees – a strip of manicured wilderness between roads and car parks, paperbarks and others:

matilda bay_3  matilda bay_4

in the university grounds as I hurried towards the lecture theatre – white trunk amidst intense green:

matilda bay_8

& this wonderful tree on the corner of a carpark:

matilda bay_2  matilda bay_6

matilda bay_7

& then it was time to go in, and after that?  Time to go to work.  No more trees till, maybe tomorrow.

& today, it rained.  A little.  Enough for me to make my students laugh as I ran outside to dance about in it.  In the middle of the city.  Oh dear 🙂  But it was such a relief after a cooler, though intensely humid day, and tonight, I will have to have a light blanket.  Much better than the 40 degree celsius of the two days before!

I hope you enjoyed my trees.  I enjoyed looking at them, and the activities of the two days 🙂

Trees in MtLawleyshire’s Hyde Park

These are from a walk I did earlier in the week  & it was a strange place to be, Hyde Park, filled with works and diggings.  It’s impossible to take photos in some areas and they still have no idea what they are going to do with the island they have razed in the middle of the eastern pond.  It remains a terrible eyesore and must bewilder the birds that used to shelter there.

hyde park_the island

They are digging up near some of the paths – the intention is to install a bio-remediation area – a reedbed to you & me.  This will clean the water that comes down from the roads into the ponds and help remove the toxicity from the mud which poisons the birds.  A good thing.  But the park at the moment is very difficult to walk around – bobcat tractors and cars and mechanical diggers, piles of sand and dirt, workmen and utes and trucks and cars, neon orange plastic fencing.

It’s a mess.

Yet the trees rise above it all, mostly.  The plane trees have suffered, their lower limbs lopped off, surrounded by the piles of sand and the plastic fencing.  I did get some reasonable shots.  In the 1st two, this is obvious, but I still love the strength in their trunks:

hyde park_10  hyde park_11

& in these, replete with leaves, glorious in sunlight:

hyde park_7  hyde park_6

This guy is so massive he rises above everything:

hyde park_12

Shapes of trees.  I don’t know what the first is, but I love the shape of the peppermint tree next to it, & I’ve posted photos of this tree before.  Possibly not from this angle:

hyde park_4  hyde park_3

The bush – paperbarks and tangle – on the western island:

hyde park_5

& here are the willows they wanted to remove.  They have been saved, but are going to be ‘managed’ – I don’t really like the sound of that.

hyde park_8

Finally, the Moreton Bay figs – nothing seems to bother them – though there were a few I couldn’t photograph because of blocked paths, etc:

hyde park_9  hyde park_13

hyde park_14  hyde park_2

hyde park_1

& one of the few paths still untroubled by ‘works’:

hyde park_15

I didn’t make it for a walk this morning – got up too late and then it was too hot.  Hopefully Wednesday.  Tomorrow, I think it might be Matilda Bay… in the heat.

The river will, at least, make a semblance of cool…

 

A walk in the heat in MtLawleyShire

It’s the 2nd day of a heatwave where not once day will dip below the old century, & today it will go well over.  I didn’t set off as early as I wanted to due to various hold-ups, so only walked around where I lived a few decades ago, and though the heat is too much for any flowers, I found a rose or 2 unspoiled by the fierce sun:

red rose

pink roses  pink rose

and trees 🙂

I was taken by the patterns in box tree bark (& thought of Wanderlust Gene as I did)

boc tree bark_2 box tree bark

& here, the papery bark of a paperbark tree:

paperbark tree bark_1  paperbark tree bark_2

paperbark tree bark_3  paperbark tree bark_4

this particular paperbark tree is in a very unphotogenic spot – no matter the angle, the tree is diminished by cars or badly designed modern housing (in what used to be a heritage area).  So, this is all I could take.  I will keep trying.

paperbark

I came across a lovely Grevillea with a few flowers:

acarket grevillea

& the gnarled, scrappy, scratchy, untidy peppermint trees.  Their girth, their relative lack of height in relation to their girth which increases as they get older somehow add to their attractiveness for me.  And the scent of them 🙂

age delicate stolidity

Intricacies of age:

untidy  intricacies of age and trunk

This little guy popped down onto grass in front of me.  Hopping all over the place.  I was lucky to get this one, almost unblurred shot!

willy wagtail_1

A streetside Plane tree – all cropped on one side.  It looks so peculiar! Esp compared to the grace of the unpruned box tree:

areetside plane tree  gracious box tree

A gardenscape:

gardenscape

White tree limbs against a sea of wind-tossed foliage and a tree dark against the day

white limbs within tossing green  sunlight and shadow

Young lemon scented gums:

Against infinity and the blasting brilliance of midmorning sun.  That deep blue sky is not enhanced.  That’s the colour it is at the moment.  It means extreme UV ratings and a fierce light.  And heat.

against infinity against mid morning

slow dancer

A few blocks on is this tree – a survivor of car crashed and urban vandalism.

survivor  compelling

& finally – these two grace the Bowling club grounds:

tree shape   almost straight

I hope to go walking very early tomorrow morning before the heat so – hopefully, there will be more.

Hope you enjoyed 🙂

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Green

What a Weekly Photo Challenge: Green.  For me, green is the colour of relaxation, of growth, of renewal as in last week’s post. Green happens after rain, verdant in winter, rich and prolific in spring, dies down to rustly yellow from mid summer to when we get rain – sometimes not till the following late winter.

Green fills spaces against the sky, softens edges in cities, broadens the restricted spaces in gardens by concealing boundaries, conflating their corners and walls with that sense of upwardness and foreverness that growth has.

And yes, for me, green is the world outside my door (though I am wearing green nail polish at this moment & no – you can’t have a photo), the lining of streets and the pools of green, dappled shadows in parks and people’s gardens.

So come with me up the green dappled path into a small sample of my world of Green

It’s a background to everything, green – even a willy wagtail staking his territorial rights on my garden gate

The bed of the beautiful rose

background for the simple & simply lovely daisy and a background for this tiny native violet

 

& the grey green makes a mysterious backing for the equally mysterious (& slightly sinister) borage flower

Green is the background and reason for lilies and all flowers, pretty (as these are) and otherwise

 

The grey green of Australian native trees becomes emboldened and something wholly other when their flowers come: bottlebrush (a spiky looking untidy tree) and the untidy, chaotic peppermint tree

 

Green is the beginning of flowers: their support & backing: their promise

 

& reflected green endows water with a sense of something else – a magical intimation of otherness: Hyde Park’s island photographed in August when the ponds were still clear enough for reflections, and a duck on a small lake that reflected native greenery on the other side:

 

City green?  Sometimes it looks quite striking, although the real ‘real’ green puts the ‘manufactured’ greens in a pallid light – to me, at least.

At other times, it brings a sense of the natural world into the built environment: the end of Pier Street in Perth’s CBD. These are the beginnings of the gardens surround the Governor’s Residence and the Supreme Court.

Then above Perth’s CBD, we have King’s Park – looking down onto the freeways leading out of the city is a verdant oasis:

and wildflowers carpet spaces of intermittent green:

 

the green of the south-west Kangaroo Paw

A Grevillea nestled amidst odd green foliage and a Geraldton wax – purple amidst its green needles

 

contrasting the northern hemisphere greens: an oak – with native Australian trees:

 

Then there is green when the sunlight is at just the right angle to turn it golden green – Hyde Park:

 

and the luxurious green of lawn striped with shadow

 

the alien green of palm against other foliage

and the unreal green of the beautiful (if feral) new leaves on a weeping willow

 

and the greens around a path in Hyde Park

but best of all: the green of massed foliage made brilliant by Spring’s new growth

 

or new leaves on old plane trees in sunlight – Hyde Park

 

I enjoyed searching through my files of greenery & I hope you enjoyed my selection 🙂

& for some reason I’m limited to 10 related articles.  Sorry :-/

Trees in MtLawley Shire’s Hyde Park

I love Hyde Park, and the plane trees and the ponds, but this time, I’m looking at another area.  There’s only a hint of plane trees in this post.

From the start of my walk, along the path leading from the corner of William Street – I think this is the Moreton Bay fig I photograph the most: in situ and picked out, just in front of its massive neighbour:

 

wandering in the area above the ponds:

 

A massive Moreton Bay:

I just love the spread of these branches:

 

Banks of foliage – looking towards the city (there’s a city? Where?)

A path:

Looking around a Moreton Bay fig’s massive trunk:

A distinctive trunk & a tree almost wonderfully bare:

 

And then, the native section:

Western Australia’s iconic jarrah tree:

 

and bark:

Must find out what these are – they look almost candy striped 🙂

An amazingly coiled peppermint tree:

a view of the native garden with the sun adding mystery:

 

Oh – course, she’s not amused I was gone so long (it’s actually after I went sunsetty photo-ing).  She wants DINNAH!

I hope you enjoyed these trees.

Keira 🙂

Around MtLawleyshire

I am coming to the time when I am not going to be able to post as often – or even reply to posts!  But over the last few days, I have done little walks here and there, and of course, while I don’t have a dog (and I would so love a dog), I do have a camera that just loves going for walks with me.

I walked a different way to Beaufort Street and came home through Hyde Park.  I haven’t included all the photos, I have saved some for later posts.  I have taken many photos, you see 🙂  And tomorrow, there won’t be much of a chance for photographs.  I have a very busy day.

So, on my walk which was the way I used to walk, long ago, when we first moved to Perth.  The streets have changed and some of the trees have gone.  But most remain.

This is an exceptionally tall tree, I’m not sure what type it is, but it is so graceful.

Peppermint trees.  There is nothing more to say, except I love the massive trunk, and am surprised by the almost symmetrical arrangement of the branches in the next photo – it is of a different tree 🙂

 

These are poinsettia.  Rad and pink.  I love the shape of the flowers, but like many trees and flowers along this street, they grew behind a wall, and were too tall for me to see the flowers properly.  They usually flower around Christmas time, so it is strange to see them in flower now.  They’re often given as Christmas presents.  I used to have one in my garden, but it didn’t get enough light.

 

A gum tree in flower with the most beautiful pink blossom.  It was too tall, and behind a wall, so I couldn’t get real close-up, but hopefully they give you an idea.

 

The sheoaks outside the post office on Beaufort Street.  I love their delicacy and the way they catch the light (& the rain when it rains).

 

This tree is just so massive!

The leaves are wonderful now.  We have had the coldest nights since last year – going down to 7 degrees.  It is welcome and fills me with hope that we might have a winter.

 

The beauty of this tree struck me, as did the colours of all the autumn foliage from the islands to the rank of plane trees behind.

 

The ponds were so still that this swamp hen barely disturbed the surface, and the same tree and other foliage was reflected as perfectly as in a mirror.

 

This tree was fascinating for its bark.

Then the walk home:

Mexican rose on an ivy-covered fence, and pomegranate in someone’s garden:

 

And yes – impatient puss-cat 🙂

 

Then the end of the evening.  If you look carefully, you will see a star amidst the darkening blue.

I hope you enjoyed these few photos 🙂

Keira.