Out of MtLawleyShire – an afternoon at Matilda Bay

An afternoon too hot and time poor to wander too far, with the river unstill and sparkling in the endless sunlight.  But it was nice to stop for an hour, have a coffee with a dear friend, before we both went back to our respective work.

There were so many swans!  On the ground in front of me on the path I took towards the tea rooms.  They have very big feet!  The second of these swan photos (it’s the same swan) paused at the foot of something larger:

Matilda Bay_2  Matilda_bay_3

A large, graceful paperbark:

Matilda Bay_7  Matilda Bay_5

& its flower:

Matilkda Bay_6

A plane tree, leaves burnt by the long heatwave, and the same damage can be seen in the leaves of the flame tree outside the tea rooms:

Matilda Bay_3  Matilda Bay_28

& this one: I am fascinated by its knobbly trunk and the way its branches have grown:

Matilda Bay_4

A cormorant on a post in the river & later I caught him just coming up from a dive:

Matilda Bay_14  Matilda Bay_26

Swans on the river:

Matilda Bay_1  Matilda Bay_17

Matilda Bay_13  Matilda Bay_11

I think this is the River family all grown up:

Matilda Bay_25  Matilda Bay_24

Matilda Bay_29

& sometimes the ubiquitous gull makes a statement: on the beach & against infinity:

Matilda Bay_22  Matilda Bay_18

There were ravens – the 2nd photo is definitely ‘quothing’:

Matilda Bay_20  Matilda Bay_21

Matilda Bay_27

The city from across the river: that infinite blue sky speaks of the heat:

Matilda Bay_10  Matilda Bay_23

Wider views towards the hills, with little bits of wind calligraphy & the long tidal ripples in the river:

Matilda Bay_31  Matilda Bay_30

 

Through the doorway of the tea rooms: it looks so invitingly green

Matilda Bay_8           Matilda Bay_9

My favourite cedar: foliage & trunk with a patch of sunlight:

Matilda Bay_15  Matilda Bay_16

Foliage:

Matilda Bay_19

& at work, in the small gardens on the corner of 2 busy roads: a bush with tiny white flowers – & a bug!

white flower  and a bug

Finally, home later at night: the moon:

tonight's moon

Hopefully, there will be a gradual cooling.  & hopefully next time I am there, I will have more time.

No sunset photos tonight, as the sky is clear, but I will be able to shoot the moon 🙂

I hope you enjoyed my little afternoon out before work.

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Trees in MtLawleyshire’s Hyde Park

These are from a walk I did earlier in the week  & it was a strange place to be, Hyde Park, filled with works and diggings.  It’s impossible to take photos in some areas and they still have no idea what they are going to do with the island they have razed in the middle of the eastern pond.  It remains a terrible eyesore and must bewilder the birds that used to shelter there.

hyde park_the island

They are digging up near some of the paths – the intention is to install a bio-remediation area – a reedbed to you & me.  This will clean the water that comes down from the roads into the ponds and help remove the toxicity from the mud which poisons the birds.  A good thing.  But the park at the moment is very difficult to walk around – bobcat tractors and cars and mechanical diggers, piles of sand and dirt, workmen and utes and trucks and cars, neon orange plastic fencing.

It’s a mess.

Yet the trees rise above it all, mostly.  The plane trees have suffered, their lower limbs lopped off, surrounded by the piles of sand and the plastic fencing.  I did get some reasonable shots.  In the 1st two, this is obvious, but I still love the strength in their trunks:

hyde park_10  hyde park_11

& in these, replete with leaves, glorious in sunlight:

hyde park_7  hyde park_6

This guy is so massive he rises above everything:

hyde park_12

Shapes of trees.  I don’t know what the first is, but I love the shape of the peppermint tree next to it, & I’ve posted photos of this tree before.  Possibly not from this angle:

hyde park_4  hyde park_3

The bush – paperbarks and tangle – on the western island:

hyde park_5

& here are the willows they wanted to remove.  They have been saved, but are going to be ‘managed’ – I don’t really like the sound of that.

hyde park_8

Finally, the Moreton Bay figs – nothing seems to bother them – though there were a few I couldn’t photograph because of blocked paths, etc:

hyde park_9  hyde park_13

hyde park_14  hyde park_2

hyde park_1

& one of the few paths still untroubled by ‘works’:

hyde park_15

I didn’t make it for a walk this morning – got up too late and then it was too hot.  Hopefully Wednesday.  Tomorrow, I think it might be Matilda Bay… in the heat.

The river will, at least, make a semblance of cool…

 

2013 Calendars of MtLawleyshire’s Hyde Park

This is the second calendar I have done (& I am rather terrified of the cost, those I have already pre-sold a few).  Most are done as gifts.  So, as you are all those with whom I have delighted to share my ‘visions’ of MtLawleyShire over the year, I thought I would share the calendars with you as well.

You can’t upload files from Publisher, so I can’t actually upload the actual calendars, so these are just the photos, many of which you will have seen.

I do both portrait and landscape orientation photos, I do 2 calendars.  I will put the photos in the order in which I used them, and put them side by side: portrait with landscape next to it.

The covers:

Calendar_2013_18  Calendar 2013_11

January:

Calendar_2013_4  january_3

February:

february_4  Calendar_2013_34

March:

Calendar_2013_30  Calendar_2013_22

April:

Calendar_2013_19  Calendar_2013_21

May:

Calendar_2013_14  Calendar_2013_26

June:

June_July  Calendar_2013_9

July:

June_1  July_landscape

August:

August_2  rain and sunlight

September:

Spring green_2 2012  Spring green 2012

October:

october_portrait  october_landscape

November:

november_4  Calender_2013_28

December:

December_2012  december_2_2012

End papers (& these are very small on the last page below December):

back cover_portrait  back cover_landscape

raindrops  July_2 2012

 

I just wish they weren’t so expensive to print.  But it’s great when you see them done 🙂

 

 

 

 

Mtlawleyshire’s Hyde Park

Hyde Park was drenched and wet and wonderful, although, as you will see in a later photo, the water is in a terrible state.  But Autumn has almost finished and winter is in the exotic trees.  Australian Natives, however, are just drinking the water in.

 

This is a tree in the Australian native section of Hyde Park.  I love the contrasts of greens and the brown of the trunk.

The oak tree hasn’t yet lost its leaves which is strange, but it looks wonderful against the autumn colour:

I’m not sure what this tree is, bit I love the way it almost seems to dance:

There were swamp hens everywhere, but they rarely stay still for photos!

 

and ducks – I am always struck by the beauty of these:

 

The contrast of conifer and deciduous plane tree is beautiful and I love the shapes of some conifers.

 

I really should find out what this tree is – so straight & tall –  & I love its bark:

 

The water, the reflections are lovely, but on closer inspection, parts of the ponds are not healthy at all.

 

But the plane trees & their leaves – beautiful:

 

 

 

Then the Moreton Bay Figs:

 

on the edge of the park – daffodils flowering – in June!  This lets you know how warm it was, earlier in the month ( these photos were taken around the 9th of June)

On the corner of the park – an almost dead conifer made a wonderful straight line with a skyscraper in the city (maybe 10 – 15 minute walk) and a telephone pole:

Across the road, a liquid amber in dull colour:

my lemon scented gum:

& then I walked home the long way around and saw some galahs:

 

a hibiscus in a neglected garden

& a cat watching me from a lane

and that’s it for the time being.  I have many more photos to post, so maybe I will post some tomorrow, if I get the time.

I hope you enjoyed it.

Keira 🙂

Another corner of MtLawleyShire

I walked down to meet a friend on Beaufort Street.  Some of the flowers were lovely

 

& as I passed the sheoak, I thought it looked strange – what was all that red?

Goodness!  Flowers!  The sheoak is flowering!  I have never seen sheoak flowers before.  Tiny & pretty and such a lovely colour.

 

I didn’t have time to go into Hyde Park, but from the other side of the road – a huge Morten Bay fig and the mass of one of the great conifers:

 

As I walked down the road, the brilliance of a liquid amber‘s autumn flames into the sky (most other liquid ambers are still green)

Morten Bay fig trees lining the street:

 

This one had almost perfect symmetry in the arrangement of its branches:

Then my friend and I walked with her dog down to a park on the corner of Bulwer and Beaufort Street.  It’s more an oval than a park, fringed with trees.  Plane trees on one side looking healthy, but on the other, not so healthy:

 

But still beautiful:

 

A couple of Moreton Bay Figs:

 

And then a massive one on the city side of the park:

 

The whole tree is huge:

walking back up Beaufort, I had time to photograph this towering gum:

 

Behind the gum was a conifer and amongst the branches – a wattled honeyeater

And home: sunset on the flowering watering and the gum tree behind

and a willy wagtail chirping and snatching insects from the ether

and there she is – my fluffy little darling 🙂

 

More Trees around Matilda Bay & the University of Western Australia

I had 2 trips to the University of Western Australia and Matilda Bay this week, and this 2nd trip – I had more time.  So – more trees.

It’s was a strange day and although the river wasn’t glass-like, the reflections of the city are clear, like great pylons sinking down as they spread support beneath the flat plane of earth the skyscrapers rest on:

 

and the rest is trees:

The flame tree growing outside the cafe.  We sit beneath it and in Spring/Summer, the flame-like, flame-red flowers drop without warning into our coffee.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A wattled honeyeater high in branches:

In the University grounds:

a dead tree surprisingly beautiful and a long tall tree of grace, made of light dappled with shadow:

 

I don’t know what this tree is but it is impossibly tall and straight:

This tree is coming back from illness and the other is a flame tree in the quadrangle by the Arts Department:

 

The space between the university & the road:

I found a scribbly gum.  I just love the bark.

 

But it’s got a freeloader!

This tree has a lovely shape, and so has the other:

 

So tall:

a gathering of trunks:

A detail of bark & a b&w paperbark detail – with a tiny surprise.  Can you spot it?

Then to my astonishment, I found an oak in the midst of all the natives!

I hope you enjoyed all these trees!  🙂

Out of mtlawleyshire #2: Trees in the University grounds

Here is the 2nd of the posts from my little outing yesterday to the University of Western Australia.  I can’t include all the photos. – there’s too many.

All these are from within the university grounds, and only a small portion of the grounds at that, but I was still spoilt for choice.  And it was raining, raining, raining!

First, a massive conifer – the detail of the trunk attracted me:

 

Then a massive tree I saw from a doorway:

 

It is really a huge tree:

the colours of bark in a group of trees outside the faculty where I met my friend:

 

2 trees: the one behind is a scribbly gum – more on them later

just love the alien look of this

a series of tall, wet gums:

 

   

 

Now the lemon scented gum.  Of course I would take photos of this lovely tree.  Though I was hampered by rain threatening to fall on the lens of my little camera.  I’m quite sure that would be disaster!

 

 

Trees and foliage from across the lawn

: 

 

The moreton bay fig.  I love how they gleam in the wet:

 

 

Now – the scribbly gum.  It gets its name from the bark which is, I read somewhere, caused by little greeblies munching through the bark – obviously not harming the tree, just giving this bark the look of having been scribbled on.  When I next go to the uni, if it’s a fine day, I will take more photos.  I love rain, but it does – well, it hampers some activities.

 

 

Of course there are plane trees, most around the internal carparks.  But the detail of the trunk, with the gloss of rain shine, brings out the most wonderful colours and reminds me I must go down to Hyde Park again before too long.

 

These guys are everywhere, especially around what used to be known as the Arts Department (where I did my Masters).

 

detail of a beautiful trunk.

These were taken from across an oval while the rain was pouring down – though you can’t see the rain.

 

The most untidy of all the trees: stringy bark!

 

just beautiful trees:

 

and home – well, it was still raining so she was inside on the armchair amongst the books

There are so many photos I didn’t include.  Heaps.  And now I’ve run out of time to do another post, but they will remain on my computer for use another time.

I hope this wasn’t too large and that you enjoyed it.

Keira 🙂