Monday’s sunset over MtLawleyshire

 

All day it was cloud pressing in the heat, but not one drop of rain.

It will be the same tomorrow.

I was impressed with the sunset though:

sunset_1

 

A magpie coloured by the amazing light.

 

sunset_2

 

A hint of virga in the violently coloured clouds

sunset_9  sunset_14

sunset_4

sunset_16  sunset_11

sunset_25

sunset_15  sunset_8

 

 

sunset_5      sunset_13

looking up William Street – clouds behind the city:

sunset_12

I wanted more detail of those molten gold clouds

sunset_20  sunset_7

sunset_23

sunset_22

& the sun appeared, for almost the first time the entire day:

sunset_21

sunset_20  sunset_24

but it went again

sunset_3  sunset_18

sunset_10  sunset_17

and the sky turns to gold as the sun sinks below the clouds, leaving them turning to dark & grey, and below the horizon, leaving the hot world to a restless night.

sunset_19

I will miss tomorrow’s sunset but I have hopes for Wednesday 🙂

Or maybe tomorrow evening will have some thunderheads…

 

 

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Out of MtLawleyShire: Early morning in the city

Monday morning, Jan 7.  Up very early – it was too hot to sleep anyway – and just as I stepped out to catch the bu? Thunder & rain.  The thunder went, the rain didn’t.  It was already over 30 degrees and raining.  It wasn’t cool in the slightest.  It was like being in the tropics!  Much as I love rain, this was a little disappointing – no photos of the flowers in the city orchard this morning!  Would I be able to take any photos at all?

When I stepped out of the air-conditioned bus in the centre of the city, it was like stepping into a hot, dripping wet blanket.  YUCK!

But – there were photos to be taken.

These tall buildings on the corner of William & Hay streets leaned together under the heavy skies like conspirators, and their customary proud gleam is dulled in the heavy light of rainy early morning

conspirators  soaring into heat and rain

I risked getting wet – & worse, my new camera getting wet – to get this shot:

gloom

As I walked down Hay Street Mall, I noticed things I’d never noticed before.  Many, because of the rain, I couldn’t photograph, but these 2 I could: an artfully painted wall at the entrance to an otherwise dingy alley, and a detail on the wall of Piccadilly Arcade.

painted wall  picadillu arcade

The view down to the end of William Street – which has lost its beauty because of the unpopular work to remove open space from the river front and add more corporate high-rise – is silenced by rain and filled with reflections on the road rather than the buildings.

towards the end of William Street

I found a cafe that was open (my normal cafe is closed until the end of January) in Hay Street Mall.  I tried to capture the wet reflections and the rain.  The green of the leaves is intensified – washed free of the fust over the last weeks of very hot days.

gleaming Hay St mall  falling rain

& as I took photos of corners saw something I hadn’t noticed before: a remnant of older architecture:

interription to sharp corners  a little grace

looking east up Hay Street is all quiet reflecting roads and grey skies and looking down Barrack Street to the river and the ‘Bell Tower’ is just greyness, except for the washed green of leaves.

wet  in the rain

Then it was time to head for the college.  I played some: a reflection in a shop window: mask over the building across the road.  It didn’t really work as the building is too blurred, but it intrigued me nonetheless.

 

 

reflection or ghost

& this building, normally so stark and white against the sky, is as grey as the sky, it lines not as stark.

even white is grey

It was a strange morning, so hot, so humid, and this was Monday.  I am posting on Wednesday, and it only began to cool down last night.  We are in for a horrendous summer.  As I drove past Hyde Park yesterday afternoon, I saw that one of the ponds is almost completely empty of water.

Global warming is going to have the most heartbreaking effects.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

mtlawleyshire – sunsets

Sunsets.  I have heard photography described as ‘painting with light’ – and this is precisely the case with sunsets.  They paint the familiar in shades of wonder & the unexpected.

This is almost a month’s worth of sunsets.  Due to all the storms, there have been some spectacular sunsets which I don’t think is normal for winter.  And they’re not in chronological order 🙂

And it’s clouds that structure an urban sunset, along with telephone poles, wires and rooftops – as well as foliage.

 

 

 

Then there is just the lightm which sometimes intimates the coming cold of night:

 

 

But the real magic is cloud and light.

These are not all on the same day, but they share teh same characteristic: venting sunset light through clouds:

 

 

Some are intensely coloured:

 

Some are a mixture of clear winter sky and cloud like fleece warming the earth below:

 

 

 

 

The solstice sunset:

 

 

 

These are dark and somehow threatening:

 

Some are almost colourless:

 

They seem more threatening, heavy, ominous:

 

 

 

One thing I love about Perth’s winter sunsets are the pale pastel colours in the evening skies.  These would’ve been shot facing east/south-east:

 

An atypical scene, taken from outside my house – I don’t normally see this spire – & Perth doesn’t have a lot of them anyway.  It was a chance shot.

This is from South Perth, looking back over the river to the city.  It was taken the same evening as all the sunsettty shots from the car that I posted in Fleeting Moment (previous post). Beside it east towards the south-east, the soft pastels of encroaching night.

 

This is by no means all my sunset photos.  In fact, I’ve just taken another batch, but I will sae them for another time.  Now I must cook dinner (for me, not the fattee cattee) & get back to work.

I hope you enjoyed this run of sunsets 🙂

Keira.


Mtlawleyshire’s Hyde Park

Hyde Park was drenched and wet and wonderful, although, as you will see in a later photo, the water is in a terrible state.  But Autumn has almost finished and winter is in the exotic trees.  Australian Natives, however, are just drinking the water in.

 

This is a tree in the Australian native section of Hyde Park.  I love the contrasts of greens and the brown of the trunk.

The oak tree hasn’t yet lost its leaves which is strange, but it looks wonderful against the autumn colour:

I’m not sure what this tree is, bit I love the way it almost seems to dance:

There were swamp hens everywhere, but they rarely stay still for photos!

 

and ducks – I am always struck by the beauty of these:

 

The contrast of conifer and deciduous plane tree is beautiful and I love the shapes of some conifers.

 

I really should find out what this tree is – so straight & tall –  & I love its bark:

 

The water, the reflections are lovely, but on closer inspection, parts of the ponds are not healthy at all.

 

But the plane trees & their leaves – beautiful:

 

 

 

Then the Moreton Bay Figs:

 

on the edge of the park – daffodils flowering – in June!  This lets you know how warm it was, earlier in the month ( these photos were taken around the 9th of June)

On the corner of the park – an almost dead conifer made a wonderful straight line with a skyscraper in the city (maybe 10 – 15 minute walk) and a telephone pole:

Across the road, a liquid amber in dull colour:

my lemon scented gum:

& then I walked home the long way around and saw some galahs:

 

a hibiscus in a neglected garden

& a cat watching me from a lane

and that’s it for the time being.  I have many more photos to post, so maybe I will post some tomorrow, if I get the time.

I hope you enjoyed it.

Keira 🙂

close to home in MtLawleyShire

No great walks over the last couple of days, and I didn’t mean to take photos, but – well, how could I not: sunsets and cats and flowers and trees in flower – and my favourite lemon-scented gum ….

The first walk I saw some roses in people’s gardens:

 

and then discovered this in a hedge of mexican rose flowing over the fence of a lady’s garden.  I know her and her little dog to say hello to.  One of her neighbours saw me taking photos of this flower and told me its name was ‘Dutchman’s Pipe“, then turned it around to show me why – you can see the shape of a pipe at the back of the flower.  He then found some seeds which I will plant later.

 

While we were talking, this sweet little tabby purred around my legs but it was too quick for photos of its very sweet little face.  I only got this one:

I walked home in time to catch sunset clouds and the glow in the western sky:

 

 

In the last of the light, I saw this wonderful wattle bush in full flower.  The perfume was wonderful.

Coming home was this: the eastern sky filled with reflected sunset pastel colours:

and here she is – waiting for me to come home:

Today I went a little earlier.  I was a warm day, not one cloud and the sunlight was bright.  All the street trees on William Street looked glorious – the paperbarks or cloud blossom trees.  You can see why it’s called cloud blossom.  I love the way one is almost growing around the speed sign.

 

I managed to take some close-ups of the blossom:

 

And then, no apologies – I took photos of my favourite tree – growing outside where I used to live.  The great glorious lemon-scented gum:

The tangle of the long thin outer branches, the strength of the core internal branches:

 

The wonderful chaotic tangle of it:

Branches compartmentalising the sky, looking like elbows:

 

The strength and size of the trunk and main branches:

 

and this – this looks just like a hand:

Further down the road, still outside where I used to live, is an ancient Grevillea – with a scarlet flower:

Further down, people had roses in their gardens:

 

and here is a lovely young gum on the street verge.

And couple of trees had gum nuts (its flowers had been yellow) and red gum blossom.  I love these 🙂

 

Walking past one place with a huge frangipani tree in flower, there was one dropped on the pavement:

and over the road, a driveway almost swallowed in white Bougainvillea:

I went to my favourite cafe – it has a bookshop next door.  I took a photo of Beaufort Street from inside, but it was too dark to be really successful.

     

Beaufort Street, looking towards the city.

Then I met my cousin who gave me a ride home, so there were no more photo 🙂

Mtlawleyshire, night and fairy tales

I walked down William Street today, on the way to meet a friend for coffee.  It had been strange day – all day it had been cloudy, as though the air itself was brooding.  No rain, just heavy air and a silence despite the sounds of traffic.  She wasn’t happy to see me go.

I was surprised to see the cloud blossom trees in flower – different trees this time

 

 

Some flowers, a little closer.  They are just a little too high for me to get a good shot without zooming (I am rather small)

 

This one had grown to envelope a telephone pole 🙂

 

The first of the next shots is the last of the wattle, and this brilliantly red tree caught my eye amongst all the green street trees. One day, I will go down that street. So much green!  All those trees!

 

And here is my old friend, the lemon-scented gum that is so massive you can’t fit it into a photo without standing almost a block away.  It is one of the largest trees in the area, and that includes the Moreton Bay figs of Hyde park!

 

 

I love how the great branches taper through the chaos of smaller branches into the delicate tangled tracery of thin long flexible twigs which is where most of the leaves are.

 

And now, Hyde Park.  I hadn’t realized how dark it was  when I got there, and my little camera doesn’t do well in low light.  So, many of the photos were blurred. As a result, I had some fun 🙂

These first 2 are from when I walked beneath the trees and too shots of the branches against the canopy.  There was enough light between the leaves to confuse the camera’s sensors.

 

Then the Moreton Bay figs.

 

This next one intrigued me with its almost fluted pillars:

here they are a little closer:

 

 

The next shots I took were all blurred.  I played when I got home – with the images:

 

   

I took a shot of the water, but I was still too far into the trees

This is what it actually looked like when I came out from under the trees: the water green with algae.  It has been very warm the last few days, and warm nights as well.  It is not good for the water quality, as there is now so little of it.

But I didn’t stay. I was running late for my coffee date, and the light was no good for taking photos, so I left, but not without taking some more.  And when I got home, none of them were any good.  So I played and discovered the secret fairy tale world within Hyde Park:

 

I will have to discover more of this world, I think 🙂

Over the road from the cafe is a florist, and I found these: Banksia flowers:

 

I will have to find trees somewhere for you.  They don’t grow in Mt Lawley Shire – I have to go further out, or maybe King’s Park.

Finally, the cafe – and here is a corner.  I like all the lines and wooden boxes and cups (for me to have my coffee in!)

Here are some shots of the city from the cafe.  It is a different perspective from the post I did above the city – those 3 buildings I last saw from above!

And here is Beaufort Street looking north – the way I went home.

I hope you enjoyed my little walk.  Next time – my magnolia flower.

Keira 🙂

Beyond and above Mtlawleyshire

What a day I had today!

It started with the cat on the pergola roof grabbing some sun.  It was a cloudy sort of day and though there was no rain forecast, it felt like it really might.

Then my friends picked me up for a dinner at a surprise location – the revolving restaurant at the top of one of the taller buildings in Perth: St Martin’s Tower.  Oh!  I was a little scared. I hate lifts and it was all the way up the top.  But we got there and then?

Oh.  Goodness!  I have never seen Perth like this, apart from when I leave on a ‘plane, and even that is usually at night (not that I do it often anyway).

I have tried to organize the photos, and I know they aren’t very good, and most are unclear.  I had some fun with the difficult reflections from inside the restaurant as well, but it does give you an idea of the sprawl of Perth, the most isolated capital city in the world.

So first – city buildings….

This blue building made a nice frame, looking down on the Barrack Street Jetty with the Bell Tower visible in the 2nd one.  Perthites are divided on what they think of the Bell Tower.  I think it is a complete waste of money, though thee are many who like it.

 

 

This is the beginning of my own William Street:

Beaufort Street, from the city to the north:

Some lovely parts of the city.  The first is St George’s Anglican Cathedral and buildings over the road from the Supreme Court Gardens and others.

 

St Mary’s Catholic cathedral – it’s tucked in near the Royal Perth Hospital.  It’s old for Perth, as is St George’s, both being built in the mid to late 1800’s.

Governor’s residence and gardens and the Perth Concert Hall.

 

Very tall buildings that seemed to be all reflections (I later found out it was the Exchange building)

   

 

The art gallery, the library, the central Plaza. I have set a novel around all this.

Views of Kings Park and beyond, and rain veils!

   

 

The river es ever present & the shots don’t do it just – window reflections, my lack of ability and sometimes, my wonderful little camera is really just that – too small.

In the middle photo you can see Fremantle Ports waaaaay in the distance.

  

River and suburbs stretching south and south-west.

 

Hyde Park in the midst of MtLawleyShire.  This is the inner suburbs and onwards, looking north.  Uncounted miles of them!

 

  

Looking east:

 

 

Looking west:

 

I know there are some photos I have forgotten to include, but I think that’s most of the clearest ones.  The reflections, the strange lighting all made it quite challenging.  It was a wonderful experience, though.  And then it was time to go.

Back on the ground.

I hate those long lift trips, but I must admit, it was worth it. The food was lovely, the service very nice, and we had laughs, the 3 of us, frequently because of me standing up and taking photos instead of eating.

It was strange seeing the buildings from the ground:

 

And the highly reflective blue building assumes an entirely different aspect from the ground:

and a lovely old building I think is a pub:

 

 

& some trees & a little city art that has always intrigued me.  These are the Supreme Court Gardens that we saw from waaaaay above, but not the sad Moreton Bay fig.  It really doesn’t look happy, not even with a little editing/enhancing.

  

 

And I get home to find that someone else was having her very own rooftop moment: