MtLawleyShire’s hunt for wildflowers

First – I must apologize to all who read this. I cannot interact with other blogs.  I can reply to comments, but can’t do anymore than that.  I don’t know what the problem is, it keeps occurring on this blog and is a damn nuisance.  And the WordPress people can’t seem to fix it either.  I will keep trying though.  and I do look at your blogs.

 

First – despite the cold and the rain, this has been teh best season for wildflowers in one of teh parts of teh world that is rightly famous for its wildflowers.  and this year, I went looking for them in more than my usual haunts.  There are/will be posts from Kings Park and Hyde Park, but this year, I took myself and camera further and to more different places.

This post is from a tiny area of remnant and conserved Banksia woodland in MtLawleyShire itself.  Banksia woodland is what the natural area is like, and though there are no photos of banksias in this post, there will be in others.  It is a tiny area, perhaps half a hectare, but the ‘friends’ of this area are doing wonderful work in replanting and caring and maintaining all the plants.

And I found flowers.  Wonderful flowers!

Spider orchids:

This was the first time I had seen a spider orchid let alone photographed one.  I was delighted, despite the awkward angle!

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Cowslip orchid – I have more photos of these in later posts, and again, this was the first time I had seen one.

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Donkey orchids – again, there will be more photos, but I love these.  This is the first time I had seen them and so difficult to photograph!

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This is affectionately called the ‘salt and pepper’ flower

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This is a type of pea – there are so many varieties.  There are bushes of this little flower and I have more examples from other places.

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Banksia flowers – or ‘fruit’

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I don’t know what these are, but they are buds and I haven’t yet seen their flowers.

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This, I believe, is dampiera – a cousin of the beautiful blue leschenaultia which will be in later posts.

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I have no idea what this is apart from totally intriguing!

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I don’t know what these delectable little things are, apart from pretty 🙂

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And this? A ‘naughty’ plant – a weed, but it was the only one that held a bee still enough for long enough 😀

flower_16  bee_1

I hope you have enjoyed this first of the ‘wildflower hunting’ posts.  There are more to come 🙂

 

December garden flowers in MtLawleyShire

Despite the heat of an early summer, there are many flowers in people’s gardens, along garden walls, on verges, which makes walking somewhere slow going 🙂

Hibiscus:

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flower_4  flower_3

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Crepe Myrtle in so many colours:

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flower_7  flower_6

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flower_4  flower_5

flower_1  flower_10

tallow candles:

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Magnolia in my garden:

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sunlight absorbers: marigold and poppy-like:

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Mexican rose and crab-apple flower:

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yarrow flowers and honeysuckle:

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and others, the last being morning-glory all closed for the evening:

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flower_3  flower_2

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Sunflowers and a Bee in MtLawleyShire

Who doesn’t love sunflowers?  These were way taller than me (OK, not tall, me, but even so) and I had trouble taking decent photographs.  I swear they were six foot tall!  Lovely though 🙂

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But – what is here?  Ooo – bee on sunflower!

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Busy bee moving slowly through the intricate landscape of the sunflower’s centre:

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head down, bum up – so much pollen a bee could get drunk 🙂

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bee traversing the pollen-laden circles

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and this is the best shot of pollen-dusted bee and petal bases, and the lovely interior landscape of the flower.

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MtLawleyShire 2016 calendars #4: waterdrops on roses

This is a ‘specialty’ post – I hae had one enquiry for such photos.  Doesn’t mean no-one else can enjoy them 🙂  Most of these would be included in a calendar.

Roses after rain.

Red:

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2016_calendar_rose_3  2016_calendar_rose_4

2016_calendar_rose_8  2016_calendar_rose_15

Deeper red:

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2016_calendar_rose_11  2016_calendar_rose_14

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Yellow and apricot roses:

2016_calendar_rose_6  2016_calendar_rose_12

2016_calendar_rose_10  2016_calendar_rose_9

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& one lone pink (that’s in my garden):

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They are pretty.  It has not, I have learned on going through my photos, rained a lot this year at all 😦

But these are pretty 🙂

Mid-October Rain in MtLawleyShire

It rained today – in an October that has seen more dryness and heat than is normal.  So I celebrate with a page of photos of raindrops.

On leaves of jasmine:

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drops_6  drops_10

drops_12  drops_13

on jasmine flowers:

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drops_3  drops_11

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on leaves of dragon trees:

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petunia leaves:

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on dead tendrils:

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on petunia flowers:

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scorched roses:

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daisies (& the alien exotic is a hoarder, even when barely open):

flowers_1  flowers_8

magnolia bud:

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and on Bauhinia buds & flowers:

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MtLawleyShire’s Buhenia flowers

Buhenia are huge, magnificent trees.  Wide and tall, wonderful beings.  they lose their leaves and flower in Spring, grow leaves and the flowers become long bean-like sed pods that in February spring open explosively, shooting teh seeds far & wide.

A few years ago, I lived on the top floor in a small apartment block – the 3rd floor – and outside the flats was a huge buhenia tree.  A white one.  It was wonderful looking at the flowers at night – it looked like a Japanese painting.

When the seeds were dispersed, all of us in the flats became accustomed to the seeds hitting the balconies and windows.  And they fell into my potplants.  I ended up with a  veritable forest of them – seedlings that continued to grow.  The landlords took most of them (with my permission & thanks) and I was left with two.  I have planted one out the front where the growing conditions aren’t brilliant, but it is growing, slowly.  It has yet to have flowers.

The other is in a pot in my courtyard, and while it hasn’t grown very big, it has in teh last two years, begun flowering.

The other day, when we had a little rain, there were clouds in the east and sunlight in the west – for a moment.  The white of the flowers against that sky was just beautiful:

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buhenia_2 buhenia_1

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and with the bright sunlight on them against a blue sky:

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flower_1  flower_2

Just a short post.