Outside of MtLawleyShire: railway line trees

MtLawleyShire, as an area (though occasionally, it is also this person – just to confuse you 🙂 ), is leafy with lovely trees and gardens.  It is an old area, the trees are large, but it is a regular suburb with roads and parks and houses.  The railway line is some distance from my normal routes, and getting near the city, is bridges and buildings without a great deal of space.  Further west, on the oldest rail line – Midland to Fremantle (which also goes through the eastern edges of MtLawleyShire) there are areas where the buffer along the tracks has been allowed to be itself.  Urban bush.  Managed, no doubt, and therefore not ‘pristine’, but nonetheless – a touch, a taste, of bush in the middle of suburbia, so this is what the railway side of the road looks like:

daglish trees_23  daglish trees_4

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I don’t know all the trees.  I recognized this one though – a massive peppermint tree, its huge girth giving an indication of its age:

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These are either lemon-scented or ghost gums – or perhaps something else entirely!  Beautiful though:

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especially this one – so straight! It makes me think it’s a ghost gum:

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A massive moreton bay fig – known as the strangler fig, it is definitely an interloper that has been here a long time.  It makes me thing the area is managed because otherwise, there would be many of them, and it is dotted with berries:

daglish trees_11  daglish trees_12

this Norfolk pine soaring above everything renders the lightpole redundant 😀

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Cheating a little – this paperbark was in someone’s garden – over the road from the urban bush, so not really straying 🙂 But of such a size! It had been there a long time:

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the first of this group is so reminiscent of something you’d see driving something other than the city – trees against the sky.  The other 2 are trees I see frequently, even in MtLawleyShire, and I think they are actually west Australian natives:

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I have no idea of the names of these trees, but they are lovely:

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and this one – the last of my photos – just magnificent!

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This post was to remind myself of my love of trees, and I hope you enjoyed it.  Bulldog, my friend – I hope this made you smile.

Next post will most likely be back in MtLawleyShire, and quite possibly, yet another sunset.

Out of MtLawleyShire: Kings Park #3 – Trees

The real wonder of Kings Park is not the gorgeousness of the wildflowers – the beauty of Kings Park are its trees.  I took quite a few photos, because I cannot resist trees and these are some of the most beautiful in the whole city (she says, having not really been everywhere…)

But I know some of you (and Bulldog in particular) will enjoy this post.

They are everywhere, the trees – viewed through a Victorian era tea pavilion to the city beyond

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Magnificent and ancient conifers:

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Trees frame the city:

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Flowering bottlebrush look beautiful against massed greens

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The occasional oak in new bright green is startling against the more subtle blue-grey greens of native trees:

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especially in contrast with the always ancient looking peppermint trees – & this one tossing in the bright warm wind that day:

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but the real beauties are the wonderful eucalypts,growing in natural settings throughout this ordered part of the park, backdrops to large lawned areas and planted areas of the Botanical gardens before the wilderness starts:

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Along the edges of the cliff, framing views of the river:

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and these – grown in avenues along the road to commemorate fallen soldiers:

 

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I love the trees, and wish I could’ve got better views of the avenues of tall trunks, white in the light.  But there was very heavy traffic, people everywhere.  Maybe when the school holidays are over…

I hope you enjoyed this last post from my visit to King’s Park 🙂

 

 

Out of MtLawleyshire – Trees at Murdoch University & Matilda Bay

I have had a busy week and while there have been no sunset photos for the end of the week, there have been lots of trees.

It is Festival season in Perth, and within the Perth festival is the Writer’s Festival – & I am a writer, of sorts.  This year, I actually attended an event at the University fo Western Australia, but before that, I was invited to attend a Q&A with China Mieville at Murdoch University in the southern suburbs.  It was an excellent talk.  He’s a very articulate engaging character, which is to be expected from his books (my favourite is The City & The City).  But, though he would probably raise his eyebrows at this, it was also a chance to look at trees.

Murdoch University has wonderful native grounds, filled with mostly natives.  But not just trees – flowers:

Grevillea:

white grevillea_murdoch  grevillea_murdoch

This – so reminiscent of a flame tree flower, but it isn’t.  Glorious red 🙂

red flower_murdoch

Eucalypt blossom:

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& the nuts they leave behind:

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Water lilies:

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& this

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Grows into this:

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Now the trees. I don’t know what this is, but its brilliant green is striking, and the duller yet graceful shape of a sheoak:

murdoch_brilliant green  murdoch_trees_2

Wonderful tree with almost furry bark:

murdoch_trees  trees_murdoch

Cape Lilac in the outside cafe:

cape lilac_murdoch  cape lilac_murdoch_2

These are just beautiful from various places around the campus:

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grace_murdoch  above it all_murdoch

& this is the trunk of a massive tree:

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Finally, two towering trees soaring into the inconstant, uneven sky of a terribly hot day threatening rain and delivering none:

tall_murdoch  matilda by_8

A plane tree in the city as I made my way home:

city plane tree

& this?  At the small park in West Perth just down from where I teach – a peppermint tree looking like a jungle unto itself:

peppermint tree jungle

Today, I attended a talk by China Mieville & the wonderful Margaret Atwood.  They played so well off each other, and Margaret Atwood is such a character – so sharp & funny & wonderfully subversive.  I love her writing, have heard her talk often and this was just as wonderful.  China Mieville was a wonderful partner for her.  Of course, with his genre writing, her novels Oyrx & Crake and After the Flood (as well as The Handmaid’s Tale)  were under discussion along with his novels  (& mention of  a book the talk reminded me of that I want to read for the PhD: Hoban’s Riddley Walker).

And although I had no time to wander along the river, everywhere you go around the University of Western Australia and Matilda Bay there are trees:

a Moreton Bay fig dappled in the inconstant sunlight today:

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matilda bay_1 soaring_murdoch

A scribbly gum and another:

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just trees – a strip of manicured wilderness between roads and car parks, paperbarks and others:

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in the university grounds as I hurried towards the lecture theatre – white trunk amidst intense green:

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& this wonderful tree on the corner of a carpark:

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& then it was time to go in, and after that?  Time to go to work.  No more trees till, maybe tomorrow.

& today, it rained.  A little.  Enough for me to make my students laugh as I ran outside to dance about in it.  In the middle of the city.  Oh dear 🙂  But it was such a relief after a cooler, though intensely humid day, and tonight, I will have to have a light blanket.  Much better than the 40 degree celsius of the two days before!

I hope you enjoyed my trees.  I enjoyed looking at them, and the activities of the two days 🙂

Trees in MtLawleyshire’s Hyde Park

These are from a walk I did earlier in the week  & it was a strange place to be, Hyde Park, filled with works and diggings.  It’s impossible to take photos in some areas and they still have no idea what they are going to do with the island they have razed in the middle of the eastern pond.  It remains a terrible eyesore and must bewilder the birds that used to shelter there.

hyde park_the island

They are digging up near some of the paths – the intention is to install a bio-remediation area – a reedbed to you & me.  This will clean the water that comes down from the roads into the ponds and help remove the toxicity from the mud which poisons the birds.  A good thing.  But the park at the moment is very difficult to walk around – bobcat tractors and cars and mechanical diggers, piles of sand and dirt, workmen and utes and trucks and cars, neon orange plastic fencing.

It’s a mess.

Yet the trees rise above it all, mostly.  The plane trees have suffered, their lower limbs lopped off, surrounded by the piles of sand and the plastic fencing.  I did get some reasonable shots.  In the 1st two, this is obvious, but I still love the strength in their trunks:

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& in these, replete with leaves, glorious in sunlight:

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This guy is so massive he rises above everything:

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Shapes of trees.  I don’t know what the first is, but I love the shape of the peppermint tree next to it, & I’ve posted photos of this tree before.  Possibly not from this angle:

hyde park_4  hyde park_3

The bush – paperbarks and tangle – on the western island:

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& here are the willows they wanted to remove.  They have been saved, but are going to be ‘managed’ – I don’t really like the sound of that.

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Finally, the Moreton Bay figs – nothing seems to bother them – though there were a few I couldn’t photograph because of blocked paths, etc:

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& one of the few paths still untroubled by ‘works’:

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I didn’t make it for a walk this morning – got up too late and then it was too hot.  Hopefully Wednesday.  Tomorrow, I think it might be Matilda Bay… in the heat.

The river will, at least, make a semblance of cool…

 

A walk in the heat in MtLawleyShire

It’s the 2nd day of a heatwave where not once day will dip below the old century, & today it will go well over.  I didn’t set off as early as I wanted to due to various hold-ups, so only walked around where I lived a few decades ago, and though the heat is too much for any flowers, I found a rose or 2 unspoiled by the fierce sun:

red rose

pink roses  pink rose

and trees 🙂

I was taken by the patterns in box tree bark (& thought of Wanderlust Gene as I did)

boc tree bark_2 box tree bark

& here, the papery bark of a paperbark tree:

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this particular paperbark tree is in a very unphotogenic spot – no matter the angle, the tree is diminished by cars or badly designed modern housing (in what used to be a heritage area).  So, this is all I could take.  I will keep trying.

paperbark

I came across a lovely Grevillea with a few flowers:

acarket grevillea

& the gnarled, scrappy, scratchy, untidy peppermint trees.  Their girth, their relative lack of height in relation to their girth which increases as they get older somehow add to their attractiveness for me.  And the scent of them 🙂

age delicate stolidity

Intricacies of age:

untidy  intricacies of age and trunk

This little guy popped down onto grass in front of me.  Hopping all over the place.  I was lucky to get this one, almost unblurred shot!

willy wagtail_1

A streetside Plane tree – all cropped on one side.  It looks so peculiar! Esp compared to the grace of the unpruned box tree:

areetside plane tree  gracious box tree

A gardenscape:

gardenscape

White tree limbs against a sea of wind-tossed foliage and a tree dark against the day

white limbs within tossing green  sunlight and shadow

Young lemon scented gums:

Against infinity and the blasting brilliance of midmorning sun.  That deep blue sky is not enhanced.  That’s the colour it is at the moment.  It means extreme UV ratings and a fierce light.  And heat.

against infinity against mid morning

slow dancer

A few blocks on is this tree – a survivor of car crashed and urban vandalism.

survivor  compelling

& finally – these two grace the Bowling club grounds:

tree shape   almost straight

I hope to go walking very early tomorrow morning before the heat so – hopefully, there will be more.

Hope you enjoyed 🙂

 

Trees in MtLawley Shire’s Hyde Park

I love Hyde Park, and the plane trees and the ponds, but this time, I’m looking at another area.  There’s only a hint of plane trees in this post.

From the start of my walk, along the path leading from the corner of William Street – I think this is the Moreton Bay fig I photograph the most: in situ and picked out, just in front of its massive neighbour:

 

wandering in the area above the ponds:

 

A massive Moreton Bay:

I just love the spread of these branches:

 

Banks of foliage – looking towards the city (there’s a city? Where?)

A path:

Looking around a Moreton Bay fig’s massive trunk:

A distinctive trunk & a tree almost wonderfully bare:

 

And then, the native section:

Western Australia’s iconic jarrah tree:

 

and bark:

Must find out what these are – they look almost candy striped 🙂

An amazingly coiled peppermint tree:

a view of the native garden with the sun adding mystery:

 

Oh – course, she’s not amused I was gone so long (it’s actually after I went sunsetty photo-ing).  She wants DINNAH!

I hope you enjoyed these trees.

Keira 🙂

More Trees around Matilda Bay & the University of Western Australia

I had 2 trips to the University of Western Australia and Matilda Bay this week, and this 2nd trip – I had more time.  So – more trees.

It’s was a strange day and although the river wasn’t glass-like, the reflections of the city are clear, like great pylons sinking down as they spread support beneath the flat plane of earth the skyscrapers rest on:

 

and the rest is trees:

The flame tree growing outside the cafe.  We sit beneath it and in Spring/Summer, the flame-like, flame-red flowers drop without warning into our coffee.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A wattled honeyeater high in branches:

In the University grounds:

a dead tree surprisingly beautiful and a long tall tree of grace, made of light dappled with shadow:

 

I don’t know what this tree is but it is impossibly tall and straight:

This tree is coming back from illness and the other is a flame tree in the quadrangle by the Arts Department:

 

The space between the university & the road:

I found a scribbly gum.  I just love the bark.

 

But it’s got a freeloader!

This tree has a lovely shape, and so has the other:

 

So tall:

a gathering of trunks:

A detail of bark & a b&w paperbark detail – with a tiny surprise.  Can you spot it?

Then to my astonishment, I found an oak in the midst of all the natives!

I hope you enjoyed all these trees!  🙂