Out of MtLawleyShire – an afternoon at Matilda Bay

An afternoon too hot and time poor to wander too far, with the river unstill and sparkling in the endless sunlight.  But it was nice to stop for an hour, have a coffee with a dear friend, before we both went back to our respective work.

There were so many swans!  On the ground in front of me on the path I took towards the tea rooms.  They have very big feet!  The second of these swan photos (it’s the same swan) paused at the foot of something larger:

Matilda Bay_2  Matilda_bay_3

A large, graceful paperbark:

Matilda Bay_7  Matilda Bay_5

& its flower:

Matilkda Bay_6

A plane tree, leaves burnt by the long heatwave, and the same damage can be seen in the leaves of the flame tree outside the tea rooms:

Matilda Bay_3  Matilda Bay_28

& this one: I am fascinated by its knobbly trunk and the way its branches have grown:

Matilda Bay_4

A cormorant on a post in the river & later I caught him just coming up from a dive:

Matilda Bay_14  Matilda Bay_26

Swans on the river:

Matilda Bay_1  Matilda Bay_17

Matilda Bay_13  Matilda Bay_11

I think this is the River family all grown up:

Matilda Bay_25  Matilda Bay_24

Matilda Bay_29

& sometimes the ubiquitous gull makes a statement: on the beach & against infinity:

Matilda Bay_22  Matilda Bay_18

There were ravens – the 2nd photo is definitely ‘quothing’:

Matilda Bay_20  Matilda Bay_21

Matilda Bay_27

The city from across the river: that infinite blue sky speaks of the heat:

Matilda Bay_10  Matilda Bay_23

Wider views towards the hills, with little bits of wind calligraphy & the long tidal ripples in the river:

Matilda Bay_31  Matilda Bay_30

 

Through the doorway of the tea rooms: it looks so invitingly green

Matilda Bay_8           Matilda Bay_9

My favourite cedar: foliage & trunk with a patch of sunlight:

Matilda Bay_15  Matilda Bay_16

Foliage:

Matilda Bay_19

& at work, in the small gardens on the corner of 2 busy roads: a bush with tiny white flowers – & a bug!

white flower  and a bug

Finally, home later at night: the moon:

tonight's moon

Hopefully, there will be a gradual cooling.  & hopefully next time I am there, I will have more time.

No sunset photos tonight, as the sky is clear, but I will be able to shoot the moon 🙂

I hope you enjoyed my little afternoon out before work.

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Trees in MtLawleyshire’s Hyde Park

These are from a walk I did earlier in the week  & it was a strange place to be, Hyde Park, filled with works and diggings.  It’s impossible to take photos in some areas and they still have no idea what they are going to do with the island they have razed in the middle of the eastern pond.  It remains a terrible eyesore and must bewilder the birds that used to shelter there.

hyde park_the island

They are digging up near some of the paths – the intention is to install a bio-remediation area – a reedbed to you & me.  This will clean the water that comes down from the roads into the ponds and help remove the toxicity from the mud which poisons the birds.  A good thing.  But the park at the moment is very difficult to walk around – bobcat tractors and cars and mechanical diggers, piles of sand and dirt, workmen and utes and trucks and cars, neon orange plastic fencing.

It’s a mess.

Yet the trees rise above it all, mostly.  The plane trees have suffered, their lower limbs lopped off, surrounded by the piles of sand and the plastic fencing.  I did get some reasonable shots.  In the 1st two, this is obvious, but I still love the strength in their trunks:

hyde park_10  hyde park_11

& in these, replete with leaves, glorious in sunlight:

hyde park_7  hyde park_6

This guy is so massive he rises above everything:

hyde park_12

Shapes of trees.  I don’t know what the first is, but I love the shape of the peppermint tree next to it, & I’ve posted photos of this tree before.  Possibly not from this angle:

hyde park_4  hyde park_3

The bush – paperbarks and tangle – on the western island:

hyde park_5

& here are the willows they wanted to remove.  They have been saved, but are going to be ‘managed’ – I don’t really like the sound of that.

hyde park_8

Finally, the Moreton Bay figs – nothing seems to bother them – though there were a few I couldn’t photograph because of blocked paths, etc:

hyde park_9  hyde park_13

hyde park_14  hyde park_2

hyde park_1

& one of the few paths still untroubled by ‘works’:

hyde park_15

I didn’t make it for a walk this morning – got up too late and then it was too hot.  Hopefully Wednesday.  Tomorrow, I think it might be Matilda Bay… in the heat.

The river will, at least, make a semblance of cool…

 

A walk in the heat in MtLawleyShire

It’s the 2nd day of a heatwave where not once day will dip below the old century, & today it will go well over.  I didn’t set off as early as I wanted to due to various hold-ups, so only walked around where I lived a few decades ago, and though the heat is too much for any flowers, I found a rose or 2 unspoiled by the fierce sun:

red rose

pink roses  pink rose

and trees 🙂

I was taken by the patterns in box tree bark (& thought of Wanderlust Gene as I did)

boc tree bark_2 box tree bark

& here, the papery bark of a paperbark tree:

paperbark tree bark_1  paperbark tree bark_2

paperbark tree bark_3  paperbark tree bark_4

this particular paperbark tree is in a very unphotogenic spot – no matter the angle, the tree is diminished by cars or badly designed modern housing (in what used to be a heritage area).  So, this is all I could take.  I will keep trying.

paperbark

I came across a lovely Grevillea with a few flowers:

acarket grevillea

& the gnarled, scrappy, scratchy, untidy peppermint trees.  Their girth, their relative lack of height in relation to their girth which increases as they get older somehow add to their attractiveness for me.  And the scent of them 🙂

age delicate stolidity

Intricacies of age:

untidy  intricacies of age and trunk

This little guy popped down onto grass in front of me.  Hopping all over the place.  I was lucky to get this one, almost unblurred shot!

willy wagtail_1

A streetside Plane tree – all cropped on one side.  It looks so peculiar! Esp compared to the grace of the unpruned box tree:

areetside plane tree  gracious box tree

A gardenscape:

gardenscape

White tree limbs against a sea of wind-tossed foliage and a tree dark against the day

white limbs within tossing green  sunlight and shadow

Young lemon scented gums:

Against infinity and the blasting brilliance of midmorning sun.  That deep blue sky is not enhanced.  That’s the colour it is at the moment.  It means extreme UV ratings and a fierce light.  And heat.

against infinity against mid morning

slow dancer

A few blocks on is this tree – a survivor of car crashed and urban vandalism.

survivor  compelling

& finally – these two grace the Bowling club grounds:

tree shape   almost straight

I hope to go walking very early tomorrow morning before the heat so – hopefully, there will be more.

Hope you enjoyed 🙂

 

More Trees around Matilda Bay & the University of Western Australia

I had 2 trips to the University of Western Australia and Matilda Bay this week, and this 2nd trip – I had more time.  So – more trees.

It’s was a strange day and although the river wasn’t glass-like, the reflections of the city are clear, like great pylons sinking down as they spread support beneath the flat plane of earth the skyscrapers rest on:

 

and the rest is trees:

The flame tree growing outside the cafe.  We sit beneath it and in Spring/Summer, the flame-like, flame-red flowers drop without warning into our coffee.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A wattled honeyeater high in branches:

In the University grounds:

a dead tree surprisingly beautiful and a long tall tree of grace, made of light dappled with shadow:

 

I don’t know what this tree is but it is impossibly tall and straight:

This tree is coming back from illness and the other is a flame tree in the quadrangle by the Arts Department:

 

The space between the university & the road:

I found a scribbly gum.  I just love the bark.

 

But it’s got a freeloader!

This tree has a lovely shape, and so has the other:

 

So tall:

a gathering of trunks:

A detail of bark & a b&w paperbark detail – with a tiny surprise.  Can you spot it?

Then to my astonishment, I found an oak in the midst of all the natives!

I hope you enjoyed all these trees!  🙂

A long way from MtLawleyShire #3: Trees

Trees.  Yes I love trees, and this post is full of them, but they are different trees – all West Australian natives, but I can’t name them all.

These first shorts were taken at the Edith Cowan University campus at Joondalup.  It had rained in the morning, and reasonably heavy showers.  The drops were still clinging to some of the needles of the sheoaks growing outside the library (& otherwise, the trees were very difficult to photograph):

 

This is one large tree growing by the access road – there aren’t many large trees on this part of the campus – it was only built a few years ago and I think many of the trees would’ve been cleared.

These trees were in the park area by the lake where we had out picnic.  We sat on rocks, or walked around actually, and most of the trees were paperbarks, but there were a few others: a young peppermint tree and a pale gum:

 

larger and older:

 

One had a family of skinks – there were more than these 2 but the others were camera-shy 🙂

 

Just the beauty and grace of this – against a sky turning blue as the clouds disappear.

 

This one had flowers out of reach:

Now, the untended bush.  It was mostly paperbarks and Banksia, but due to a fire a few years ago, the Banksia forest was thin, most of the trees (shrubs?) obviously young.

First – paperbarks, though obviously, this is a manicured grove 🙂

 

a clutch of wilderness displaying some of the inherent characteristics of the paperbark – chaos and untidiness being the first two I can think of.  Wonderful shapes and shadows, though.

 

 

They look so old:

 

Then we started walking around, hoping to get down to another part of the lake.  On either side we were surrounded by bush – on one side paperbark tangles:

 

 

 

On the other side of the path was a narrow band of Banksia forest & some had flowers high up against the sky.  It was a jungle of thin spindly trunks and striped shadows.  They all looked like the Banksia prionotes, the same as those at the university campus.  They don’t have the same sculptural appearance of the paperbark, but I could imagine, many thousands of years ago, having to be wary of the striped mainland variety of the Tasmanian tiger.  It would’ve moved like a ghost through these:

 

 

  

 

Occasionally, there were other trees amongst the Banksia, some regenerating after fire:

Two groups of ibis flew over us as we walked:

 

and the path walking back to the car gave a different perspective of the trees:

 

There were quite a few dead trees, from previous bushfires.  This one is marked for removal, but there were many of them.  Many fallen as well.  I suppose they are leaving a lot there as quite a few birds use hollows in old trees for nesting, so the more that can remain, the better.  Although it seems full and lush, the bush fringe around the lake is only a 100 meters deep at most, and the birds are dying out because of habitat loss.

We drove around to the other side of the lake.  The reed beds here were very deep so we couldn’t get near the lake and otherwise, the grounds were manicured into football ovals.  But there were trees:

huge paperbarks:

 

 

and there were other trees as well, massive great things:

 

 

and this – probably one of my favourite photos of the day:

Next post – what kitty had to say when I got home 🙂

Between the river and the university

Today I went to visit my old professor at the university of Western Australia.  It is Western Australia’s oldest university & has the most beautiful grounds, filled with huge trees of all sorts – my favourites and others.  So you can imagine – yes.  Photos.  And oh dear.  I took over 200 – in 2 hours!

I can’t post them all, & many aren’t suitable anyway (rain is not good for little cameras – or Keiras!), but even so – there are too many for one post. so I am going to attempt to group them.

As it was raining, some of the photos were hurried & blurred.  But many were OK, though I fear there’s not too many that are brilliant.  However, even in this first post, there are different trees.

First – along the river.  The university is on the banks (sort of) of the Swan River, and I parked in the Matilda Bay carpark.  The city was barely visible through the mist of rain:

trees against the river:

 

Peppermint trees and a tall gum:

 

Moreton bay figs in the rain:

 

 

 

 

Then the area between the road and the university, filled with all sorts of trees – almost wilderness:

 

These two are trees I haven’t come across in mtlawleyshire, but of course, the university is a long way from my little shire 🙂  I love the colour of these and I really will, soon – I promise – get hold of a reference book so I can figure out what trees these are

 

 

 

 

The first of the next two photos is, I think, a stringy bark, as the bark hangs off in strips like strings.  They can be very untidy!

and look – more rain coming:

I will do the next post tomorrow – in the grounds of the university.  And this is despite the rain.  And no – no kitty for this part of the post.  How can there be?  And the end of this post, as far as the pictures tell the story, I am still at the university 🙂

Mtlawleyshire, night and fairy tales

I walked down William Street today, on the way to meet a friend for coffee.  It had been strange day – all day it had been cloudy, as though the air itself was brooding.  No rain, just heavy air and a silence despite the sounds of traffic.  She wasn’t happy to see me go.

I was surprised to see the cloud blossom trees in flower – different trees this time

 

 

Some flowers, a little closer.  They are just a little too high for me to get a good shot without zooming (I am rather small)

 

This one had grown to envelope a telephone pole 🙂

 

The first of the next shots is the last of the wattle, and this brilliantly red tree caught my eye amongst all the green street trees. One day, I will go down that street. So much green!  All those trees!

 

And here is my old friend, the lemon-scented gum that is so massive you can’t fit it into a photo without standing almost a block away.  It is one of the largest trees in the area, and that includes the Moreton Bay figs of Hyde park!

 

 

I love how the great branches taper through the chaos of smaller branches into the delicate tangled tracery of thin long flexible twigs which is where most of the leaves are.

 

And now, Hyde Park.  I hadn’t realized how dark it was  when I got there, and my little camera doesn’t do well in low light.  So, many of the photos were blurred. As a result, I had some fun 🙂

These first 2 are from when I walked beneath the trees and too shots of the branches against the canopy.  There was enough light between the leaves to confuse the camera’s sensors.

 

Then the Moreton Bay figs.

 

This next one intrigued me with its almost fluted pillars:

here they are a little closer:

 

 

The next shots I took were all blurred.  I played when I got home – with the images:

 

   

I took a shot of the water, but I was still too far into the trees

This is what it actually looked like when I came out from under the trees: the water green with algae.  It has been very warm the last few days, and warm nights as well.  It is not good for the water quality, as there is now so little of it.

But I didn’t stay. I was running late for my coffee date, and the light was no good for taking photos, so I left, but not without taking some more.  And when I got home, none of them were any good.  So I played and discovered the secret fairy tale world within Hyde Park:

 

I will have to discover more of this world, I think 🙂

Over the road from the cafe is a florist, and I found these: Banksia flowers:

 

I will have to find trees somewhere for you.  They don’t grow in Mt Lawley Shire – I have to go further out, or maybe King’s Park.

Finally, the cafe – and here is a corner.  I like all the lines and wooden boxes and cups (for me to have my coffee in!)

Here are some shots of the city from the cafe.  It is a different perspective from the post I did above the city – those 3 buildings I last saw from above!

And here is Beaufort Street looking north – the way I went home.

I hope you enjoyed my little walk.  Next time – my magnolia flower.

Keira 🙂