Far from MtLawleyShire #4: Views of Araluen

The last of the posts of Araluen.  these are photos of views of the park – though it was a dismal (but delightful) day.

I saw many birds: fairy wrens – the boys in their iridescent blue, the girls in their soft browns, New Holland Honey eaters amongst others – & this little fellow: a robin in a wintered tree.  So suited to the European aspect of the gardens.

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The bridge over the pond was closed, so I could only get these photos of the – um – whatever it is.  I love the trees around them.

araluen_view_1  araluen_view_2

araluen_view_3  araluen_view_4

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From the tearooms – you can see wattle gleaming amongst the sombre greens.  The twisted wood is wisteria – huge and only just starting to bud.  It would look beautiful in full flower.

araluen_view_8  araluen_view_9

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did I mention it rained?  The 1st of these photos is my favourite.

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This was my attempt to capture water running through a rocky stream bed.  I need more – much more – practise at taking those photos (fast or slow shutter speed) to catch moving water:

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And this was at the entrance to the gardens 😀  It was too cold to worry about snakes, but should I go there again, before summer, before the flowers fade, then I will bear it in mind.

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One the way home, we decided to try a scenic route and got delightfully lost.  And as we descended the hills, the Swan River coastal plain with all its city was laid out before us, including the eruption of the CBD of Perth with its skyscrapers.  Much hilarity was caused by me trying to get these shots through the windscreen.  Every time I thought I had it, round a curve we’d go, or a tree would obscure the view or she’d go over a bump.  But I got these.  And the last (& best) is proof there was some sun on the day.

coming home_1 coming home_2

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It was a lovely day.

I hope you enjoyed these posts.

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Far From MtLawleyShire #3 Trees

Trees.  The Araluen Botanical Garden is surrounded by them.  This is the third of four posts on my expedition to the Gardens.  No tulips this time, but flowers are still visible.  This post is devoted to trees.

Just before you get to the carpark, there is a bare patch because it’s a rose farm, but that’s not visible from the gardens.  Mostly they are native Australian trees with the odd plane tree or European spruce.  Basically, if the branches are bare, it’s not from around here.

And here are 2 examples: ghost-pale against the darker greens – though in the 2nd photo, some of those greens are conifers and it was raining too much t go and check what kind they were:

trees_1 trees_5

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the brilliant gold of flowering wattle lifts the subtle greens of the West Australian bush

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in some areas, the fact that it’s a park, not wilderness is visible

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in some areas, it looks like pure wilderness 🙂

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this massive tree on the lawns, with neighbouring ghost gum and the background of ghostly deciduous waiting for spring’s touch:

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and some of the shapes made wonderful silhouettes:

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trees_9       trees_16

Outside of MtLawleyShire: railway line trees

MtLawleyShire, as an area (though occasionally, it is also this person – just to confuse you 🙂 ), is leafy with lovely trees and gardens.  It is an old area, the trees are large, but it is a regular suburb with roads and parks and houses.  The railway line is some distance from my normal routes, and getting near the city, is bridges and buildings without a great deal of space.  Further west, on the oldest rail line – Midland to Fremantle (which also goes through the eastern edges of MtLawleyShire) there are areas where the buffer along the tracks has been allowed to be itself.  Urban bush.  Managed, no doubt, and therefore not ‘pristine’, but nonetheless – a touch, a taste, of bush in the middle of suburbia, so this is what the railway side of the road looks like:

daglish trees_23  daglish trees_4

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I don’t know all the trees.  I recognized this one though – a massive peppermint tree, its huge girth giving an indication of its age:

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These are either lemon-scented or ghost gums – or perhaps something else entirely!  Beautiful though:

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daglish trees_21  daglish trees_10

especially this one – so straight! It makes me think it’s a ghost gum:

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A massive moreton bay fig – known as the strangler fig, it is definitely an interloper that has been here a long time.  It makes me thing the area is managed because otherwise, there would be many of them, and it is dotted with berries:

daglish trees_11  daglish trees_12

this Norfolk pine soaring above everything renders the lightpole redundant 😀

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Cheating a little – this paperbark was in someone’s garden – over the road from the urban bush, so not really straying 🙂 But of such a size! It had been there a long time:

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the first of this group is so reminiscent of something you’d see driving something other than the city – trees against the sky.  The other 2 are trees I see frequently, even in MtLawleyShire, and I think they are actually west Australian natives:

daglish trees_1  daglish trees_13

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I have no idea of the names of these trees, but they are lovely:

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daglish trees_16  daglish trees_22

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and this one – the last of my photos – just magnificent!

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This post was to remind myself of my love of trees, and I hope you enjoyed it.  Bulldog, my friend – I hope this made you smile.

Next post will most likely be back in MtLawleyShire, and quite possibly, yet another sunset.

Out of MtLawleyShire: Kings Park #3 – Trees

The real wonder of Kings Park is not the gorgeousness of the wildflowers – the beauty of Kings Park are its trees.  I took quite a few photos, because I cannot resist trees and these are some of the most beautiful in the whole city (she says, having not really been everywhere…)

But I know some of you (and Bulldog in particular) will enjoy this post.

They are everywhere, the trees – viewed through a Victorian era tea pavilion to the city beyond

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Magnificent and ancient conifers:

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trees_9  trees_10

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Trees frame the city:

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Flowering bottlebrush look beautiful against massed greens

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The occasional oak in new bright green is startling against the more subtle blue-grey greens of native trees:

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especially in contrast with the always ancient looking peppermint trees – & this one tossing in the bright warm wind that day:

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but the real beauties are the wonderful eucalypts,growing in natural settings throughout this ordered part of the park, backdrops to large lawned areas and planted areas of the Botanical gardens before the wilderness starts:

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Along the edges of the cliff, framing views of the river:

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and these – grown in avenues along the road to commemorate fallen soldiers:

 

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I love the trees, and wish I could’ve got better views of the avenues of tall trunks, white in the light.  But there was very heavy traffic, people everywhere.  Maybe when the school holidays are over…

I hope you enjoyed this last post from my visit to King’s Park 🙂

 

 

MtLawleyShire visits Matilda Bay

On this dark wintry afternoon, I was at Matilda Bay and, as always, it was richly rewarding.  Where we usually sit, my friend & I, is beneath the flame tree.  Unlike those trees around the corner from my home, the Matilda Bay flame tree is not showing full flowers.  It is more reticent, perhaps because it is near the water so it’s a little cooler.  But there are one or two, and buds that are showing signs…

Matilda Bay_flame tree_2  Matilda Bay_flame tree_3

 

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Matilda Bay_flame tree_1  Matilda Bay_flame tree_6

Matilda Bay_flame tree_5  Matilda Bay_trees_4

 

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There were, of course, birds:

Willy wagtail in the flame tree & a raven – not at the same time

willy wagtail_Matilida Bay_1  Matilda Bay_raven

Swans & ducks on the river:

Matilda Bay_swans  Matilda Bay_ducks

the ubiquitous seagull

Matilda Bay_seagull_1

but it was a dark day with storms threatening from all directions (& eventuated the moment I stepped in my house on my return!):

Matilda Bay_dark day_2  Matilda Bay_dark day_3

 

the clouds & bared winter trees give some delightfully spooky shots:

Matilda Bay_spooky  Matilda Bay_dark day_1

Matilda Bay_trees_2

& wonderfully evocative cloud forms:

Matilda Bay_dark day_6  Matilda Bay_clouds

Matilda Bay_dark day_4 Matilda Bay_dark day_5

Matilda Bay_clouds_2

Then, as always, there were the trees.  This is 1 or 2 plane trees – magnificent & I couldn’t find the right angle, but so pale and beautiful against the buildings of the University of Western Australia, and the building storm of sky:

Matilda Bay_trees_6  Matilda Bay_trees_8

Matilda Bay_trees_7  Matilda Bay_trees_9

 

& this amazing tree:

Matilda Bay_trees_10  Matilda Bay_trees_5

glorious on the edge of the road that skirts Matilda Bay:

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& 2 of my favourites in the reserve:

Matilda Bay_trees_1           Matilda Bay_trees_12

It was a cold, shivery wonderful afternoon & now it’s dark and raining hard and my little courtyard is flooded.

Time for dinner 🙂

 

Out of MtLawleyshire – Trees at Murdoch University & Matilda Bay

I have had a busy week and while there have been no sunset photos for the end of the week, there have been lots of trees.

It is Festival season in Perth, and within the Perth festival is the Writer’s Festival – & I am a writer, of sorts.  This year, I actually attended an event at the University fo Western Australia, but before that, I was invited to attend a Q&A with China Mieville at Murdoch University in the southern suburbs.  It was an excellent talk.  He’s a very articulate engaging character, which is to be expected from his books (my favourite is The City & The City).  But, though he would probably raise his eyebrows at this, it was also a chance to look at trees.

Murdoch University has wonderful native grounds, filled with mostly natives.  But not just trees – flowers:

Grevillea:

white grevillea_murdoch  grevillea_murdoch

This – so reminiscent of a flame tree flower, but it isn’t.  Glorious red 🙂

red flower_murdoch

Eucalypt blossom:

blossom_murdoch  blossom_murdoch_2

& the nuts they leave behind:

nuts_murdoch

Water lilies:

waterlilies_murdoch

& this

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Grows into this:

murdoch_bamboo  murdoch_bamboo_1

Now the trees. I don’t know what this is, but its brilliant green is striking, and the duller yet graceful shape of a sheoak:

murdoch_brilliant green  murdoch_trees_2

Wonderful tree with almost furry bark:

murdoch_trees  trees_murdoch

Cape Lilac in the outside cafe:

cape lilac_murdoch  cape lilac_murdoch_2

These are just beautiful from various places around the campus:

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grace_murdoch  above it all_murdoch

& this is the trunk of a massive tree:

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Finally, two towering trees soaring into the inconstant, uneven sky of a terribly hot day threatening rain and delivering none:

tall_murdoch  matilda by_8

A plane tree in the city as I made my way home:

city plane tree

& this?  At the small park in West Perth just down from where I teach – a peppermint tree looking like a jungle unto itself:

peppermint tree jungle

Today, I attended a talk by China Mieville & the wonderful Margaret Atwood.  They played so well off each other, and Margaret Atwood is such a character – so sharp & funny & wonderfully subversive.  I love her writing, have heard her talk often and this was just as wonderful.  China Mieville was a wonderful partner for her.  Of course, with his genre writing, her novels Oyrx & Crake and After the Flood (as well as The Handmaid’s Tale)  were under discussion along with his novels  (& mention of  a book the talk reminded me of that I want to read for the PhD: Hoban’s Riddley Walker).

And although I had no time to wander along the river, everywhere you go around the University of Western Australia and Matilda Bay there are trees:

a Moreton Bay fig dappled in the inconstant sunlight today:

moreton bay fig_matilda bay

matilda bay_1 soaring_murdoch

A scribbly gum and another:

matilda bay_5  matilda bay_4

just trees – a strip of manicured wilderness between roads and car parks, paperbarks and others:

matilda bay_3  matilda bay_4

in the university grounds as I hurried towards the lecture theatre – white trunk amidst intense green:

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& this wonderful tree on the corner of a carpark:

matilda bay_2  matilda bay_6

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& then it was time to go in, and after that?  Time to go to work.  No more trees till, maybe tomorrow.

& today, it rained.  A little.  Enough for me to make my students laugh as I ran outside to dance about in it.  In the middle of the city.  Oh dear 🙂  But it was such a relief after a cooler, though intensely humid day, and tonight, I will have to have a light blanket.  Much better than the 40 degree celsius of the two days before!

I hope you enjoyed my trees.  I enjoyed looking at them, and the activities of the two days 🙂

An evening walk in MtLawleyShire – and Jupiter!

I went for a walk down to Beaufort Street a couple of days ago, but haven’t had a chance to post – working and so on.  And I am still not used to the settings on my camera – or checking them before I take photos, so these roses are in light too low for crisp detail.

The first of these seems to have light inside it & all I can think of is that it caught the light of the lowering sun.  The 2nd is just a pretty bud.

inner light  rosebud

& these – the orangey one is overblown, but still beautiful, considering that most roses I saw that evening were scorched by the hot sunny days we’ve had recently.

pretty  still beautiful

A tree loaded with pomegranates – ripe-looking pomegranates.  Maybe I should’ve nicked one or 2!

pomegranates

Late afternoon light on the branches of a lovely tall gum on William street, and the second photo is of my ‘pied beauty’ friend, also on William Street.  These 2 trees are almost opposite one another.  One is a sort of street tree, the other grows in the grounds surrounding a block of flats.

light on a trunk  pied beauty

On a side road, this tree, spindly and untidy, soars gracefully into forever and light behind a box tree adds mystery & magic:

into the sky  light behind branches

The wonderful shapes of the lemon scented gum street trees: they keep them lopped so they don’t entangle the power lines.

lemon-scented street tree  contorted branches_2

contorted branches

And then – I saw a pair of galahs – they started far apart, but then began to groom each other:

galahs_7  galahs

galahs_3  galahs_2

galahs_4  galahs_5

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I finished my shopping and began walking home.  Sunset glow was visible ahead of me, behind the rise:

glow

At the top of the rise – William Street, the glow was broad:

beyond  wide sky

To the east, the pastels were beautiful.  The second of these is the same tree that up above has light on its trunk:

easter pastels  evening pastels

And although there were no clouds, nothing to differentiate the sunset, I had to take photos of that tree:

that tree_2 that tree_3

that tree_1

& finally – lastly – the moon.

 

It turned out to be  the piece de resistance!

I caught – without knowing what it was – the occultation (or the beginnings of) the moon with Jupiter.  I actually got Jupiter in my little camera!!  OK, very small, unbanded, totally undetailed Jupiter, but it *is* Jupiter!

tonight's moon with jupiter in attendance

🙂