Sheoaks in MtLawleyShire

Wanderlust Gene has found out some information about a flowering sheoak I photographed & posted a couple of days ago: red fluffy little flowers.  I had never seen flowers on a sheoak before.  And Wanderlust Gene discovered in researching that this is the female tree.  I’ve posted them again:

 

So, I have just come back from a dash to the Post Office.  In the carpark there are two beautiful (& large) sheoaks – & I hadn’t noticed any flowers.  But Wanderlust Gene read that the male sheoak has yellow flowers – sort of.

I think I found evidence that the sheoaks outside the post office are ‘he-oaks’ 🙂

Beautiful trees, and you can tell the oder of the photos by the amount of green in the needle leaves – the last shot is as the sun was setting over MtLawleyShire 🙂

 

 

See?  Beautiful fluffy reflected sunset light 🙂

 

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A quick trip to MtLawleyShire’s university

I had to drop off some books at the Mount Lawley campus of Edith Cowan University, where I’m doing my PhD, & on the way back to the carpark, saw some trees in flower.  Some were difficult to photograph as the flowers were very shiny & the sunlight was so bright, but hopefully this gives you an idea:

 

Others were lovely, the epitome of Australian gum tree blossom, though the tree itself is a strange one, very striking with the young branches and twigs white, like the gumnuts left behind after the flower had finished, the green leaves and dark trunks.

 

 

 

These are so newly opened they still have their caps on

There were other trees, but I had only a little time, so just this one with its height and intriguing bark:

 

and that’s all.  And I got to return my books before they were overdue 🙂

 

Out of mtlawleyshire #2: Trees in the University grounds

Here is the 2nd of the posts from my little outing yesterday to the University of Western Australia.  I can’t include all the photos. – there’s too many.

All these are from within the university grounds, and only a small portion of the grounds at that, but I was still spoilt for choice.  And it was raining, raining, raining!

First, a massive conifer – the detail of the trunk attracted me:

 

Then a massive tree I saw from a doorway:

 

It is really a huge tree:

the colours of bark in a group of trees outside the faculty where I met my friend:

 

2 trees: the one behind is a scribbly gum – more on them later

just love the alien look of this

a series of tall, wet gums:

 

   

 

Now the lemon scented gum.  Of course I would take photos of this lovely tree.  Though I was hampered by rain threatening to fall on the lens of my little camera.  I’m quite sure that would be disaster!

 

 

Trees and foliage from across the lawn

: 

 

The moreton bay fig.  I love how they gleam in the wet:

 

 

Now – the scribbly gum.  It gets its name from the bark which is, I read somewhere, caused by little greeblies munching through the bark – obviously not harming the tree, just giving this bark the look of having been scribbled on.  When I next go to the uni, if it’s a fine day, I will take more photos.  I love rain, but it does – well, it hampers some activities.

 

 

Of course there are plane trees, most around the internal carparks.  But the detail of the trunk, with the gloss of rain shine, brings out the most wonderful colours and reminds me I must go down to Hyde Park again before too long.

 

These guys are everywhere, especially around what used to be known as the Arts Department (where I did my Masters).

 

detail of a beautiful trunk.

These were taken from across an oval while the rain was pouring down – though you can’t see the rain.

 

The most untidy of all the trees: stringy bark!

 

just beautiful trees:

 

and home – well, it was still raining so she was inside on the armchair amongst the books

There are so many photos I didn’t include.  Heaps.  And now I’ve run out of time to do another post, but they will remain on my computer for use another time.

I hope this wasn’t too large and that you enjoyed it.

Keira 🙂

Bellissimo – an urban sunset over mtlawleyshire

I didn’t walk further than the corner to catch the sunset.

The houses there have wild, secretive gardens and in one, flowering wattle spilled over the fence.  It was after sunset when I took these, and I’m afraid they’re not too clear at all.  My little camera doesn’t handle low light at all well, and the flash would flare everything out.  Sigh.

 

so I played a little – though not sure the results are all that fantastic.

 

There are peppermint street trees on this particular corner.  Not anciently thick, craggy ones like those in the heart of mtlawleyshire.  These are younger, slimmer and haven’t achieved their full form yet.  When they do, they will be amazing – they have incredibly divided trunks – which might mean they were chopped down at some stage and have grown from the stump, though I couldn’t see any sign of that.  And they were taken against the sunset:

 

But beautiful against the sky:

and this is in a garden – a mix of trees, their foliage against evening:

And here is the sunset:

 

 

I actually spent most of the time I usually take photos talking to an old lady who lives on the corner where I was taking photos.  She hardly spoke any English, yet she came here from Italy 44 years ago.  She never went to school, never worked, but spent most of the time looking after her elderly parents.  Her children?  One is in Italy, the other visits every now and then.  Yet she didn’t seem at all worried.  I’m glad I made her laugh.  She agreed that the sunset was ‘bellissimo’  🙂

MtLawleyShire’s smallest park?

Brigatti Gardens.  I can’t find why it’s there, or the reason for the name, but it’s obviously been there for a long time, this pocket-sized park with huge trees.   It holds a small children’s play set, but that’s all.  It’s well kept and neat, & while I’m not saying Hyde Park is a tangle, it has the islands in the middle of the ponds which give it an unmanicured heart.  These tiny gardens are really that: a calm and tended garden.  It’s maybe the size of an old house block (they are much smaller these days), in quiet streets down from the trendy section of Beaufort Street – we could call it ‘upper Beaufort” as opposed to ‘lower Beaufort’ where the supermarket, post office and theatre are.  Ha ha… No.  I like both ends of MtLawleyShire’s Beaufort Street.  ‘Upper’ is in Highgate which is where this pocket park, Brigatti Gardens, is.

Not all the trees in these Gardens are plane trees or Morten Bay figs, but most of them are.

This is a detail of bark from a tree I don’t know: 

And this one remind me of a tuning fork:

But mostly, it’s plane trees, Morten Bay figs and small garden areas planted with the distinctly non-native Agapanthus.  Of course, the trees aren’t native either – plane trees aren’t native to Australia & Morten Bay figs are originally from the east coast: Queensland & NSW, but they do well here too.

So, this post is all trees with smidgens of sky and hints of road, cars & surrounding buildings.  But it’s the trees I am concentrating on.  Rather nice houses line the surrounding streets & as I walked around, I thought how lovely it must be to live with the sound of the wind rustling through the leaves and tall branches.  And the birds that must live there!  Honey eaters and magpies, magpie larks and willy wagtails.  I saw not a one while I was there.  It was strangely quiet, empty, with only the rustling trees whispering their ancient sweet nothings to me.

First, the Morten Bay Figs.  There weren’t many.  They are huge trees and this is not a huge park, but there were enough 🙂

Branches:

 

 

Leaves:

 

 

the massive trunks:

 

 

Plane trees:

 

 

Branches:

 

 

 

Mingled leaves and branches of both plane trees & Morten Bay figs:

 

 

and finally, a b&w of a looping branch:

For such a little park, there were many angles and many details that delighted my little camera.  I hope the results delight you 🙂

Keira.

In the Heart of MtLawleyShire:Native flowers & Eucalypt blossom

These are flowers I took over the last couple of days.  The buds on the lemon scented gums and others mean there will be more flowers soon.

Grevillea – I love these.  They are such a beautiful colour (though there are colours other than scarlet.  I have posted one of yellow before, and I think a pale yellow as well) and occur in so many different places – waste ground, corners, neglected areas of gardens.  Birds love them.  If you have Grevillea in your garden, you will have many honeyeaters – & bees which will bring other types of birds as well.

   

 

a long bottlebrush flower:

And these, high up on a tree:

and these, on the tree next door:

and then, these:

The red were on a tree in someone’s garden so I couldn’t go in and get close ups:

 

And these yellow ones are out of story books (Australian: SnugglePot and CuddlePie, by May Gibbs).  The yellow is so beautiful, although the tree (in a later post) is twisted and old with rough bark and shape:

   

I hope you enjoyed these.  I enjoyed discovering them.

Keira 🙂