Trees in MtLawley Shire’s Hyde Park

I love Hyde Park, and the plane trees and the ponds, but this time, I’m looking at another area.  There’s only a hint of plane trees in this post.

From the start of my walk, along the path leading from the corner of William Street – I think this is the Moreton Bay fig I photograph the most: in situ and picked out, just in front of its massive neighbour:

 

wandering in the area above the ponds:

 

A massive Moreton Bay:

I just love the spread of these branches:

 

Banks of foliage – looking towards the city (there’s a city? Where?)

A path:

Looking around a Moreton Bay fig’s massive trunk:

A distinctive trunk & a tree almost wonderfully bare:

 

And then, the native section:

Western Australia’s iconic jarrah tree:

 

and bark:

Must find out what these are – they look almost candy striped 🙂

An amazingly coiled peppermint tree:

a view of the native garden with the sun adding mystery:

 

Oh – course, she’s not amused I was gone so long (it’s actually after I went sunsetty photo-ing).  She wants DINNAH!

I hope you enjoyed these trees.

Keira 🙂

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23 comments on “Trees in MtLawley Shire’s Hyde Park

  1. eof737 says:

    You do capture some amazing looking trees. Love the shots. 😉

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  2. Madhu says:

    Utterly gorgeous series Keira! Plushie does appear very upset though 🙂

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  3. bulldogsturf says:

    Love these as usual, I’m at present far fropm home and get very little time on the internet, but saw yours and had to have a look… I am visiting family in the outback of RSA and have taken a ton of photos of a tree just for you… it is on the endangered list and actually a magnificent tree… will post next week when I return to civilization…

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    • ah – that explains it 🙂 I thought of you as I took some of these photos – & you weren’t there 😦 But you is being a grandad? 🙂 I am looking forward to your photos. Enjoy your holiday 🙂

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  4. marviiilous says:

    what a collection of trees the park has!!! great shots! and that fluffy girl seems as big as a tree now 🙂

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  5. cocomino says:

    That’s a serene place. I like such places and would like to read books there.

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  6. zannyro says:

    The lighting is just magnificent! I’m so jealous 🙂

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  7. Very nice trees, and photos. And cat. Liked them a lot, Keira.

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    • Thanks 🙂 I must admit, there is a great joy in taking such photos & it’s a wonderful thing to be able to share them. As for the fattee cattee? She is a joy, regardless of her expression 😀

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  8. Lee Ellzey says:

    Nice shots!

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  9. niasunset says:

    I fall in love with these amazing trees…. They are great and so beautiful… Always hit me. Thank you dear Keira, have a nice day, love, nia (kisses for your lovely cat!)

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  10. You’ve surpassed yourself this time Keira! Each one elicited a wow, or an oooh, or aaah – till I got dizzy, going back and forth to look, again and again. The bark was wondrous. I loved rushing along the path, back and forth like Alice, through the tunnel, then being mesmerised by the peppermint’s coils, but the convocation of trees, in the end, stopped my roaming … Fabulous visit to the park – Puss will just have to learn to suck it in and wear it when you come back with collections like this!

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    • 🙂 I hope I continue improving! It was wonderful to just stop and look at the trees before taking photos – seeing things & deciding when I’ve lift my little camera to do its work. It’s not a large park, but somehow, when thus engaged, it seems to go on forever & I know there’s years of exploration to do yet 🙂 I’m glad you enjoyed my vision of some of the trees 🙂

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      • I used to spend a lot of time in the park, walking, plant watching, escaping from my petty problems, back when I was there – even saw Jesus Christ Super Star, the Easter of 1972, I think it was – was cold, anyway …

        It seemed like a mature park then, but when I look at your photographs, and see the trees now, I can see that 40 years have passed. Its’ original concept was brilliant and my memories of it have always made it one of the most beautiful city parks I’ve ever seen.

        So you see, I’m always very happy to tag along and see your vision of the trees:)

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      • 1972. That was the year my mum died. We had only been here (Perth) for 7 months. And I didnn’t know Hyde Park at all. First visit might’ve been March 72 but more likely the next year. We lived in Longroyd Street then, up the top of the short steep hill. I think, although the trees are lovely, you’d be sad at the state of the ponds. I’m a little – more than a little – concerned about plans to renovate them – they’re going to revegetate the isladns and I’m just hoping they leave the mature stands of bottlebrush & paperbark which are so beutiful when they flower en masse.
        And how amazing to consider that in 1972, Easter was cold, now it’s the tail end of summer and hot 😦 Autu,n doesn’t really hit (if we’re lucky) till May and this year, despite some exceptionally cold nights late May (2 I think), it didn’t get properly winter cold till half way through June. Hence the daffodils flowering a month ago.

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