Far from MtLawleyShire #4: Views of Araluen

The last of the posts of Araluen.  these are photos of views of the park – though it was a dismal (but delightful) day.

I saw many birds: fairy wrens – the boys in their iridescent blue, the girls in their soft browns, New Holland Honey eaters amongst others – & this little fellow: a robin in a wintered tree.  So suited to the European aspect of the gardens.

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The bridge over the pond was closed, so I could only get these photos of the – um – whatever it is.  I love the trees around them.

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From the tearooms – you can see wattle gleaming amongst the sombre greens.  The twisted wood is wisteria – huge and only just starting to bud.  It would look beautiful in full flower.

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did I mention it rained?  The 1st of these photos is my favourite.

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This was my attempt to capture water running through a rocky stream bed.  I need more – much more – practise at taking those photos (fast or slow shutter speed) to catch moving water:

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And this was at the entrance to the gardens 😀  It was too cold to worry about snakes, but should I go there again, before summer, before the flowers fade, then I will bear it in mind.

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One the way home, we decided to try a scenic route and got delightfully lost.  And as we descended the hills, the Swan River coastal plain with all its city was laid out before us, including the eruption of the CBD of Perth with its skyscrapers.  Much hilarity was caused by me trying to get these shots through the windscreen.  Every time I thought I had it, round a curve we’d go, or a tree would obscure the view or she’d go over a bump.  But I got these.  And the last (& best) is proof there was some sun on the day.

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It was a lovely day.

I hope you enjoyed these posts.

Far From MtLawleyShire #3 Trees

Trees.  The Araluen Botanical Garden is surrounded by them.  This is the third of four posts on my expedition to the Gardens.  No tulips this time, but flowers are still visible.  This post is devoted to trees.

Just before you get to the carpark, there is a bare patch because it’s a rose farm, but that’s not visible from the gardens.  Mostly they are native Australian trees with the odd plane tree or European spruce.  Basically, if the branches are bare, it’s not from around here.

And here are 2 examples: ghost-pale against the darker greens – though in the 2nd photo, some of those greens are conifers and it was raining too much t go and check what kind they were:

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the brilliant gold of flowering wattle lifts the subtle greens of the West Australian bush

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in some areas, the fact that it’s a park, not wilderness is visible

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in some areas, it looks like pure wilderness 🙂

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this massive tree on the lawns, with neighbouring ghost gum and the background of ghostly deciduous waiting for spring’s touch:

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and some of the shapes made wonderful silhouettes:

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MtLawleyShire and Matilda Bay trees

Taken over 2 visits – one a cloudy day with soft, uncertain light – typical look for Autumn though the day itself was humid and warm and unpleasant.  And then there was today: bright and brassy and warm but not humid, the loveliest of Autumn weather (though we need rain).

That Autumn is here is written in the plane trees:

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I love teh sculptural attitude of these:

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Banks of Autumn:

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and leaves:

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Today – a couple of weeks later: delicate gold.  I am wondering what will remain next time I go!

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And then there are the other trees:

on the cloudy day, everything was shrouded in that soft light:

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even the mighty Moreton Bay fig was softened and others were enriched by a golden sort of light:

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but today – no such uncertainty, everything written in bold lines of light and shadow:

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this one – tall in trunk and branch:

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I love this tree – it is massive & photos don’t do it justice:

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and these:

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I do love the trees of Matilda Bay.

MtLawleyShire and a Sunday afternoon walk

I have a sunset to post, from last night, but it is going to take a while because it was spectacular.  Today, the sunset was merely glare in a featureless summer sky, but before that, there were flowers, bees, trees and birds

Flowers:

In sumptuous shadow and flowing light – hibiscus

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the outrageous and glowing colour of bougeanvillea:

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catching the light in the wind:

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I walked past a beautiful rose garden:

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a tiny, richly glowing geranium outside a picket fence:

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Grevillea:

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the flowers of a tallow tree:

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Coral gum blossom – one with bee 🙂

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a raven in a carpark, calling out to his mob:

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Favourite trees:

the piebald one on the corner two blocks up

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The lemon-scented gum:

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and a tall tree down near Beaufort Street:

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a tree of a different kind – & can you see the moon in the wide empty sky?

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then it was time to go home –

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Next – bees and blossoms.

Then, young moon and sunset.

I hope you enjoyed this post 🙂

 

Out of MtLawleyShire: Matilda Bay & apologies

This will probably be my last post for another little while – so much study, and I am getting there!  And then I will spend happy hours catching up with all your posts.  There are so many I wanted to look at but they come so this and fast!

But this was a visit to Matilda Bay this week – the day after I went to Kings Park and the weather had turned gloomy and colder. There were almost no flowers, just these – a white non-native where last year there had been massed ground covering Grevillea. Very sad to see places fall into neglect.  And the flowers of the cape lilac tree, filling the air with subtle perfume.  These trees are also regarded as ferals, but they are delicate additions to a landscape of leaves.

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There don’t seem to be any cygnets on the Swan River this year, but the family from last year is still here.  I have played with these photos – I might use them as cards.  What do you think?

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I caught a raven, on the grass, then in the huge old cypress, cawing to other members of his family:

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and trees: the contrasts with brilliant Spring leaves of plane trees against the native greens in the darkening day,

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And here are clouds gathering across the Swan, and a rain cell dumping its load over South Perth and parts east towards the hills.

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Now this guy? Not hovering over Matilda Bay – he’s hovering over the roofs of MtLawleyShire, near my own little house, reminding me to get back home and onto the computer and WORK! A sparrowhawk. Not a great photo, but still – I am happy with it. He wasn’t just hanging there!

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I hope you enjoyed this little excursion.  I will be back, and looking forward to catching up with you all.

🙂

Out of MtLawleyShire: Kings Park #3 – Trees

The real wonder of Kings Park is not the gorgeousness of the wildflowers – the beauty of Kings Park are its trees.  I took quite a few photos, because I cannot resist trees and these are some of the most beautiful in the whole city (she says, having not really been everywhere…)

But I know some of you (and Bulldog in particular) will enjoy this post.

They are everywhere, the trees – viewed through a Victorian era tea pavilion to the city beyond

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Magnificent and ancient conifers:

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Trees frame the city:

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Flowering bottlebrush look beautiful against massed greens

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The occasional oak in new bright green is startling against the more subtle blue-grey greens of native trees:

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especially in contrast with the always ancient looking peppermint trees – & this one tossing in the bright warm wind that day:

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but the real beauties are the wonderful eucalypts,growing in natural settings throughout this ordered part of the park, backdrops to large lawned areas and planted areas of the Botanical gardens before the wilderness starts:

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Along the edges of the cliff, framing views of the river:

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and these – grown in avenues along the road to commemorate fallen soldiers:

 

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I love the trees, and wish I could’ve got better views of the avenues of tall trunks, white in the light.  But there was very heavy traffic, people everywhere.  Maybe when the school holidays are over…

I hope you enjoyed this last post from my visit to King’s Park 🙂

 

 

Heartbreak in MtLawleyShire’s Hyde Park

I don’t know what to say about Hyde Park.  It hurts every time I go down there.  This should be the start of the most beautiful tome, but the place is a ruin.  Certainly opportunities for taking photographs is very limited.

You are not allowed into the native area:

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The beauty of the plane trees has been compromised by the lopping of all their lower branches:

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The island where all the bottle brush flowered?

Do you remember this? (last September)

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Now it looks like this:

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The graceful avenue around the ponds?

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Many of the paths are compromised – behind this hoarding is a huge trench where they are laying pipes.  I was told they were intending to establish a reed bed to clean the water as it flows down the hill when (if) it rains, but I don’t understand what the pipes are for:

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And it is not just the plane trees that are being lopped:

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But I found a few angles:

A small moreton bay fig

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Trees as frames

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An unspoilt corner:

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A heron in one of the ponds:

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Finally, some plane trees in the strong, hot light of a supposedly Autumnal sun:

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It hurts, seeing the park in such a state, and I am not the only one horrified by what is happening.  I have been told the works are not following the guidelines laid down by the conservation society and I will be following that up over the next couple of weeks.

& I took some other photos here and there:

a lovely pink rose & red roses in a roadside garden:

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Cloud blossom on a tree in William Street – with a bee!

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Galahs on a telephone pole in the evening:

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And finally, a hibiscus flower caught in the lowering light of a hot day:

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bit of a mixed bag, this post, fill of as much ugliness as beauty.

I am so saddened by what is happening in Hyde Park.  I don’t know that I will be producing a calendar this year 😦