Another corner of MtLawleyShire

I walked down to meet a friend on Beaufort Street.  Some of the flowers were lovely

 

& as I passed the sheoak, I thought it looked strange – what was all that red?

Goodness!  Flowers!  The sheoak is flowering!  I have never seen sheoak flowers before.  Tiny & pretty and such a lovely colour.

 

I didn’t have time to go into Hyde Park, but from the other side of the road – a huge Morten Bay fig and the mass of one of the great conifers:

 

As I walked down the road, the brilliance of a liquid amber‘s autumn flames into the sky (most other liquid ambers are still green)

Morten Bay fig trees lining the street:

 

This one had almost perfect symmetry in the arrangement of its branches:

Then my friend and I walked with her dog down to a park on the corner of Bulwer and Beaufort Street.  It’s more an oval than a park, fringed with trees.  Plane trees on one side looking healthy, but on the other, not so healthy:

 

But still beautiful:

 

A couple of Moreton Bay Figs:

 

And then a massive one on the city side of the park:

 

The whole tree is huge:

walking back up Beaufort, I had time to photograph this towering gum:

 

Behind the gum was a conifer and amongst the branches – a wattled honeyeater

And home: sunset on the flowering watering and the gum tree behind

and a willy wagtail chirping and snatching insects from the ether

and there she is – my fluffy little darling 🙂

 

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Around MtLawleyshire

I am coming to the time when I am not going to be able to post as often – or even reply to posts!  But over the last few days, I have done little walks here and there, and of course, while I don’t have a dog (and I would so love a dog), I do have a camera that just loves going for walks with me.

I walked a different way to Beaufort Street and came home through Hyde Park.  I haven’t included all the photos, I have saved some for later posts.  I have taken many photos, you see 🙂  And tomorrow, there won’t be much of a chance for photographs.  I have a very busy day.

So, on my walk which was the way I used to walk, long ago, when we first moved to Perth.  The streets have changed and some of the trees have gone.  But most remain.

This is an exceptionally tall tree, I’m not sure what type it is, but it is so graceful.

Peppermint trees.  There is nothing more to say, except I love the massive trunk, and am surprised by the almost symmetrical arrangement of the branches in the next photo – it is of a different tree 🙂

 

These are poinsettia.  Rad and pink.  I love the shape of the flowers, but like many trees and flowers along this street, they grew behind a wall, and were too tall for me to see the flowers properly.  They usually flower around Christmas time, so it is strange to see them in flower now.  They’re often given as Christmas presents.  I used to have one in my garden, but it didn’t get enough light.

 

A gum tree in flower with the most beautiful pink blossom.  It was too tall, and behind a wall, so I couldn’t get real close-up, but hopefully they give you an idea.

 

The sheoaks outside the post office on Beaufort Street.  I love their delicacy and the way they catch the light (& the rain when it rains).

 

This tree is just so massive!

The leaves are wonderful now.  We have had the coldest nights since last year – going down to 7 degrees.  It is welcome and fills me with hope that we might have a winter.

 

The beauty of this tree struck me, as did the colours of all the autumn foliage from the islands to the rank of plane trees behind.

 

The ponds were so still that this swamp hen barely disturbed the surface, and the same tree and other foliage was reflected as perfectly as in a mirror.

 

This tree was fascinating for its bark.

Then the walk home:

Mexican rose on an ivy-covered fence, and pomegranate in someone’s garden:

 

And yes – impatient puss-cat 🙂

 

Then the end of the evening.  If you look carefully, you will see a star amidst the darkening blue.

I hope you enjoyed these few photos 🙂

Keira.

Hyde Park – a walk in the afternoon

Last Sunday I went down to Hyde Park.  It had been a week since I was there, and we’d had rain.  I wanted to see the ponds.

As I stepped out of my gate, I saw:

They are growing outside the gate, underneath the ivy.  It rained, yes, and it is sort of Autumn, yes, but it’s not cold.  I was rather enchanted with the way they grew though.

Hyde Park was its usual beautiful self:

The Morten Bay figs – there are shapes in these trees, and the folds of their bark looks like thick skin:

 

 

 

But there is another tree as big, though not as intricately shaped.  I don’t know what type of tree it is, but it is huge:

 

Then the lovely plane trees

 

 

The more leaves that fall, carpeting the ground, the more their structure is revealed:

 

 

and their autumnal colours make the park seem more vibrant than the grey rainy air felt, all the ponds looking full of water (it’s probably barely 10 mm deep!) so the colours are reflected:

 

The islands were filled with beauty:

 

I was just so intrigued by the lines of the willow that I had to play:

I found these on the ground near the ponds:

 

And then there aer these: the most ancient looking tree in the park:

 

I looked back before I left – the day wasn’t misty, the light was rather strong, but my little camera sometimes has problems with it, so it makes a very atmospheric photo:

I reflected as I walked home, on the park.  It is going to change.  There are repairs and renovations that are needed.  The original plan, to completely change it, take out all the ‘exotics’ (which would include the plane trees) was voted down by the residents who want it to remain as an ornamental park, although there will be changes to the islands so they clean the water, the lakes will be made smaller, and hopefully all the plane trees will remain and survive as their roots are probably going to be terribly disturbed.

They have not yet decided about lining the lakes because if they do, trees will die as they won’t be able to access water, and if they don’t, the water will drain away.

I have a heartache – thinking about the trees that might die, but it is true – there are problems in the park because of the lack of water in the whole Perth area now.

But it will be there for a while yet.  I am dreading them starting work because I won’t be able to go to the park anymore.

So I came home to my fluffy kitty to find her sharing the armchair with a plush Cthulhu.  🙂

 

Out of mtlawleyshire #2: Trees in the University grounds

Here is the 2nd of the posts from my little outing yesterday to the University of Western Australia.  I can’t include all the photos. – there’s too many.

All these are from within the university grounds, and only a small portion of the grounds at that, but I was still spoilt for choice.  And it was raining, raining, raining!

First, a massive conifer – the detail of the trunk attracted me:

 

Then a massive tree I saw from a doorway:

 

It is really a huge tree:

the colours of bark in a group of trees outside the faculty where I met my friend:

 

2 trees: the one behind is a scribbly gum – more on them later

just love the alien look of this

a series of tall, wet gums:

 

   

 

Now the lemon scented gum.  Of course I would take photos of this lovely tree.  Though I was hampered by rain threatening to fall on the lens of my little camera.  I’m quite sure that would be disaster!

 

 

Trees and foliage from across the lawn

: 

 

The moreton bay fig.  I love how they gleam in the wet:

 

 

Now – the scribbly gum.  It gets its name from the bark which is, I read somewhere, caused by little greeblies munching through the bark – obviously not harming the tree, just giving this bark the look of having been scribbled on.  When I next go to the uni, if it’s a fine day, I will take more photos.  I love rain, but it does – well, it hampers some activities.

 

 

Of course there are plane trees, most around the internal carparks.  But the detail of the trunk, with the gloss of rain shine, brings out the most wonderful colours and reminds me I must go down to Hyde Park again before too long.

 

These guys are everywhere, especially around what used to be known as the Arts Department (where I did my Masters).

 

detail of a beautiful trunk.

These were taken from across an oval while the rain was pouring down – though you can’t see the rain.

 

The most untidy of all the trees: stringy bark!

 

just beautiful trees:

 

and home – well, it was still raining so she was inside on the armchair amongst the books

There are so many photos I didn’t include.  Heaps.  And now I’ve run out of time to do another post, but they will remain on my computer for use another time.

I hope this wasn’t too large and that you enjoyed it.

Keira 🙂

Between the river and the university

Today I went to visit my old professor at the university of Western Australia.  It is Western Australia’s oldest university & has the most beautiful grounds, filled with huge trees of all sorts – my favourites and others.  So you can imagine – yes.  Photos.  And oh dear.  I took over 200 – in 2 hours!

I can’t post them all, & many aren’t suitable anyway (rain is not good for little cameras – or Keiras!), but even so – there are too many for one post. so I am going to attempt to group them.

As it was raining, some of the photos were hurried & blurred.  But many were OK, though I fear there’s not too many that are brilliant.  However, even in this first post, there are different trees.

First – along the river.  The university is on the banks (sort of) of the Swan River, and I parked in the Matilda Bay carpark.  The city was barely visible through the mist of rain:

trees against the river:

 

Peppermint trees and a tall gum:

 

Moreton bay figs in the rain:

 

 

 

 

Then the area between the road and the university, filled with all sorts of trees – almost wilderness:

 

These two are trees I haven’t come across in mtlawleyshire, but of course, the university is a long way from my little shire 🙂  I love the colour of these and I really will, soon – I promise – get hold of a reference book so I can figure out what trees these are

 

 

 

 

The first of the next two photos is, I think, a stringy bark, as the bark hangs off in strips like strings.  They can be very untidy!

and look – more rain coming:

I will do the next post tomorrow – in the grounds of the university.  And this is despite the rain.  And no – no kitty for this part of the post.  How can there be?  And the end of this post, as far as the pictures tell the story, I am still at the university 🙂

Work and a sore foot

Due to work pressures and a sore foot, there was no walking today.  This will happen more and more.  My PhD is demanding work and  have some very serious deadlines coming.  I hope you don’t forget me if I don’t get to post as often.

Today I took some pics in the garden.  They’re not spectacular.  It’s Autumn, despite the warmth, so there aren’t many flowers and my little garden is looking distinctly untidy.

But there are some flowers.  A large begonia has some bells, pale pink and subtle, they are pretty,but difficult to photograph:

   

Some herbs are flowering – red basil and the rosemary, but not many flowers – only one spike on the basil and about 5 on the rosemary:

 

one tiny pot of everlastings are still flowering, and a self seeded flower is growing in an unemptied but otherwise untenanted pot (obviously, this flower has become the tenant!):

 

some jasmine is flowering both over the pergola and amongst the ivy flowering over the back fence (the ivy is very untidy so no photograph):

 

and then there’s the untidy, usually ugly hedge between my place and the unit next door.  This is the only time of year it looks OK, mostly it is rather ugly, full of dead growth and it’s very invasive, especially over areas where I hang my washing!  But its yellow flowers are surprisingly pretty and I have a suspicion that a pair of singing honeyeaters nest there:

 

This is one of the areas of massed green in my little courtyard – lavender and dogsbane:

and I love the shape of rue leaves:

 

And of course she was in the garden – the sweetest flower of all:

Then evening came, with the beauty of the evening star above the lingering sunset:

and that is all.  No trees 😦

maybe tomorrow…..if I do enough work today.

Keira

 

Mtlawleyshire, night and fairy tales

I walked down William Street today, on the way to meet a friend for coffee.  It had been strange day – all day it had been cloudy, as though the air itself was brooding.  No rain, just heavy air and a silence despite the sounds of traffic.  She wasn’t happy to see me go.

I was surprised to see the cloud blossom trees in flower – different trees this time

 

 

Some flowers, a little closer.  They are just a little too high for me to get a good shot without zooming (I am rather small)

 

This one had grown to envelope a telephone pole 🙂

 

The first of the next shots is the last of the wattle, and this brilliantly red tree caught my eye amongst all the green street trees. One day, I will go down that street. So much green!  All those trees!

 

And here is my old friend, the lemon-scented gum that is so massive you can’t fit it into a photo without standing almost a block away.  It is one of the largest trees in the area, and that includes the Moreton Bay figs of Hyde park!

 

 

I love how the great branches taper through the chaos of smaller branches into the delicate tangled tracery of thin long flexible twigs which is where most of the leaves are.

 

And now, Hyde Park.  I hadn’t realized how dark it was  when I got there, and my little camera doesn’t do well in low light.  So, many of the photos were blurred. As a result, I had some fun 🙂

These first 2 are from when I walked beneath the trees and too shots of the branches against the canopy.  There was enough light between the leaves to confuse the camera’s sensors.

 

Then the Moreton Bay figs.

 

This next one intrigued me with its almost fluted pillars:

here they are a little closer:

 

 

The next shots I took were all blurred.  I played when I got home – with the images:

 

   

I took a shot of the water, but I was still too far into the trees

This is what it actually looked like when I came out from under the trees: the water green with algae.  It has been very warm the last few days, and warm nights as well.  It is not good for the water quality, as there is now so little of it.

But I didn’t stay. I was running late for my coffee date, and the light was no good for taking photos, so I left, but not without taking some more.  And when I got home, none of them were any good.  So I played and discovered the secret fairy tale world within Hyde Park:

 

I will have to discover more of this world, I think 🙂

Over the road from the cafe is a florist, and I found these: Banksia flowers:

 

I will have to find trees somewhere for you.  They don’t grow in Mt Lawley Shire – I have to go further out, or maybe King’s Park.

Finally, the cafe – and here is a corner.  I like all the lines and wooden boxes and cups (for me to have my coffee in!)

Here are some shots of the city from the cafe.  It is a different perspective from the post I did above the city – those 3 buildings I last saw from above!

And here is Beaufort Street looking north – the way I went home.

I hope you enjoyed my little walk.  Next time – my magnolia flower.

Keira 🙂