Mtlawleyshire’s Hyde Park

Hyde Park was drenched and wet and wonderful, although, as you will see in a later photo, the water is in a terrible state.  But Autumn has almost finished and winter is in the exotic trees.  Australian Natives, however, are just drinking the water in.

 

This is a tree in the Australian native section of Hyde Park.  I love the contrasts of greens and the brown of the trunk.

The oak tree hasn’t yet lost its leaves which is strange, but it looks wonderful against the autumn colour:

I’m not sure what this tree is, bit I love the way it almost seems to dance:

There were swamp hens everywhere, but they rarely stay still for photos!

 

and ducks – I am always struck by the beauty of these:

 

The contrast of conifer and deciduous plane tree is beautiful and I love the shapes of some conifers.

 

I really should find out what this tree is – so straight & tall –  & I love its bark:

 

The water, the reflections are lovely, but on closer inspection, parts of the ponds are not healthy at all.

 

But the plane trees & their leaves – beautiful:

 

 

 

Then the Moreton Bay Figs:

 

on the edge of the park – daffodils flowering – in June!  This lets you know how warm it was, earlier in the month ( these photos were taken around the 9th of June)

On the corner of the park – an almost dead conifer made a wonderful straight line with a skyscraper in the city (maybe 10 – 15 minute walk) and a telephone pole:

Across the road, a liquid amber in dull colour:

my lemon scented gum:

& then I walked home the long way around and saw some galahs:

 

a hibiscus in a neglected garden

& a cat watching me from a lane

and that’s it for the time being.  I have many more photos to post, so maybe I will post some tomorrow, if I get the time.

I hope you enjoyed it.

Keira 🙂

37 comments on “Mtlawleyshire’s Hyde Park

  1. HoaiPhai says:

    Wow! Your galahs are so beautiful! Here in Canada we have them but here they sport drab brown or grey plumage and are voted into Parliament every four years.

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    • Laughing! I love the galahs & to see them flying at sunset with the intense light on their pink feathers is never to be forgotten. WE have the other variety as well, but frankly, they do a discourtesy to the name!

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      • HoaiPhai says:

        The Canadian galahs all sing the same monotonous song taught to them by their press secretaries. I don’t believe they truly understand what they’re singing because they only come through with their promises at a rate predicted by random probability calculations.

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      • exactly the same thing here. Disheartening, isn’t it 😦

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  2. John Todaro says:

    Many interesting tree images…nicely vignetted!

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  3. tamara says:

    so beautiful the trees are great work

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  4. eof737 says:

    Love trees. love Hyde Park. Love your photos. 🙂

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  5. N Filbert says:

    amazing photographs

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  6. marviiilous says:

    glad to see your photos again! 🙂

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  7. Madhu says:

    Wonderrful tree portraits! Some of your best yet! Love them all 🙂

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  8. bulldogsturf says:

    Wonderful pictures as always… the straight and tall tree is it not of the pine family, maybe the cedar pine…
    I am actually fascinated by the fact that you are receiving rain at this time of the year… are you not a summer rainfall region? or is Perth on the same line of latitude as Cape Town and receives a winter rainfall..?
    Liquid Amber is it indigenous to Aussie? I was under the impression they were a bit sensitive to heat…

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    • Liquid ambers aren’t native to Australia at all, but we had a huge one in teh front garden in MElbourne when I was a kid. There aren’t many of them in Perth, but enough to keep the memory of it alive in me. And yes, Perth is supposed to receive the bulk of its rain in winter – it hasn’t been happening over the last few years, or not as much. I fear it will return to what it was thousands of years ago – colder, arid winters, more desert winter, which are beautiful but when there are no rains in summer either, deadly 😦
      Glad you liked the trees 🙂

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      • bulldogsturf says:

        These days the weather is of the extremes My house has now been under water twice in ten years, but the last time it happened in recorded history was 80 years ago… we are in a summer rainfall area and it is either torrential rain or none at all, none of the old time peach rain, when it drizzled for 7 to 10 days and soaked everything, but was good for the land…haven’t seen that in 30 years…

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      • yeah – extremes here too. The Eastern States (QLD, NSW & Vic) suffered flood after flood after flood all last year, and MElbournians complained they had no summer, are getting heaps of rain now, but this is after a 12 year drought, so they really need it. Here it just gets hotter and hotter. With the occasional extreme storm that brings little relief because there’s no run off, our dams remain extremely low because the ground is so thirsty.

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      • bulldogsturf says:

        well for your sakes and the lands I hope it continues to rain for so long that all you can do is take photos of wet trees…

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      • Oh me too! But this side of the country didn’t get the extreme rainfall. And everyone in Perth complains if it rains for longer than 2 weeks. They’re all complaining aobut the weather now, wanting the heat, forgetting that the trees they all rave about don’t have airconditioning and that it’s the air conditioning they all use (to escape the heat they all rave about) that is part of the problem.

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      • bulldogsturf says:

        If we only had the answers, and the weather men that could tell us what to expect in the future….

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      • I think what we can expect is an end to climate stability & therefore predictablity. That’s what’s happening here – & that’s in line with modelling on climate change. And climate instability is not a good thing to ponder – at all 😦

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      • bulldogsturf says:

        Scary stuff….

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      • oh yeah – & heartbreaking.

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  9. Very nice tree pictures! And bird pictures! 🙂

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    • Oh thank you so much 🙂 The birds are very difficult to catch ’cause they usually don’t sit still (the ducks were sleeping). And I love my trees 🙂 They *always* stand still 😀

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  10. jensine says:

    beautiful, particularly like Just Trees June9

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  11. niasunset says:

    Reblogged this on photographyofnia and commented:
    Fascinating me her tree photographs…

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  12. niasunset says:

    I love your tree photographs… they are great. Fascinated again… I missed them so much too… Thank you dear Keira, love, nia

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    • I am always taking photos, Nia – otherwise, I would miss them too. There will be more to post when I have some more spare time. I’m so glad they bring you wnjoyment. Love, Keira xx

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  13. Anna says:

    So glad you got water at last. Enough to save the trees? x

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    • It’s not lack of water causing the trees problems, it’s heat. It gets so hot, and for such sustained periods of time, that they effectivly starve so they don’t lose water. This weakens them to the point where they have no defense against all the opportune infections and invasions so – they die. The ones that started dying last summer will continue to do so – their have the tree equivalent of cancer. It’s heartbreaking.

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      • Anna says:

        So sorry to hear this, must be hard to witness. I expect other, more heat tolerant species will take over? Or are there a general die-off of trees in Western Australia?

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      • There is, sadly, a general die-off in the forests all over the world, and the trees that are dying here are the native trees in the remaining forests down south and around Perth. Some are almost gone now – tyit trees and the ancient banksia groves. Some are no longer dropping seeds. It is heartbreaking. THe result of a warming world.

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