Sheoaks in MtLawleyShire

Wanderlust Gene has found out some information about a flowering sheoak I photographed & posted a couple of days ago: red fluffy little flowers.  I had never seen flowers on a sheoak before.  And Wanderlust Gene discovered in researching that this is the female tree.  I’ve posted them again:

 

So, I have just come back from a dash to the Post Office.  In the carpark there are two beautiful (& large) sheoaks – & I hadn’t noticed any flowers.  But Wanderlust Gene read that the male sheoak has yellow flowers – sort of.

I think I found evidence that the sheoaks outside the post office are ‘he-oaks’ 🙂

Beautiful trees, and you can tell the oder of the photos by the amount of green in the needle leaves – the last shot is as the sun was setting over MtLawleyShire 🙂

 

 

See?  Beautiful fluffy reflected sunset light 🙂

 

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22 comments on “Sheoaks in MtLawleyShire

  1. Yea, I reckon you’ve got he-oakes at the post office! And magnificent he looks, at sunset. What a marvellous sight. Wonderful shots, dear Mt. Lawleyshire. Now you’ve just gotta keep a lookout for some other ladies around the place:)

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    • I’m thinking that the one on the other side of Walcott Street is also a he-oak, and can’t think of where any more are for the moment. But what a wonderful thing to learn! Thank you, Wanderlust 🙂

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      • We must learn more about them. Why there are so few females, for instance. But it is great, isn’t it, to look with different eyes at something? Other than the different flower colour/configuration, I wonder if the trees are identifiable any other way?

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      • My quiestion exactly. I was comparing the photos, but the light makes such a difference. I think there are some at Matilda Bay so shall check there, but can’t think of any others around here. Some at Banks Reserve on the eastern ‘border’ of my MtLawleyShire, so might have to revisit – although am very heavily into the PhD at the moment…

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      • PhD comes first, Keira. Good to hear you’re on a run there – I can imagine how difficult it is to keep up the enthusiasm now you’ve finished the creative part of the project:)

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      • Well, the novel was finished but the more I do on the exegesis – which is what I’m working on now. Enthusiasm, interest – but oh! TO gather the words together & figure out how to say what I want to say!!! So yes, will be posting a lot less, probably from now – but feel free to email 🙂 I won’t stop taking photos but it takes so long to do a post that it will definitely go into a hiatus mode…Why is philosophy sooooo fascinating (& I’m playing in the theory of the aesthetic so the photos are, while not at all, oddly relevant!)

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      • Philosophy’s what it’s all about, is why, and now you’re into the theory of it all, you’re head’s whirling and that’s fantastic:)
        Head down, tail up … go for it girl:)

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      • Yes, I guess it is 🙂 & yes, head whirling so much I’m getting headaches (or maybe that’s the thought of reading more Kant…)
        Thanks 🙂

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      • Ah, Kant might do it!

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      • oh yeah! I much prefer Burke & in fact, Burke is much more suitable for what I’m doing. You seem to know about this stuff. What’s your background?

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  2. Inga says:

    Wonderful light and wonderful photos. 🙂

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  3. bulldogsturf says:

    sheoaks, heoaks, everyone an oak oak,………. old Mac Donald had a farm….. interesting fact, the male and female having a different colour flower, I wonder how often that happens in nature? Love the photos (obviously) you could even make a dead oak look good.

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    • Well thank you 🙂 They’re not the oaks most people think of. I first became aware of them (though have lived in this area a couple of decades so always knew of the trees at teh post office) when I did a road trip with a friend down the middle of Australia. One of the places we stayed in, at Kings Canyon, had this absilutely huge trees – sheoaks – Causariana or something by their latin name. They’re obciously hot weather trees with those needle leaves, but yes, I was astonished to learn of the difference. I know avacado trees are one make & one female before you get a fruit, and there are quite a few plants like that, but I’m not sure of trees either.
      I wish I’d had more time this afternoon to take photos, but the batteries in my hard working little camera was on its deathbed 🙂

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      • bulldogsturf says:

        Now you mention the name Causariana it makes me think of the trees I had to cut down at one golf course, it had a small flower and made a small almost nut shape seed that grew in clusters. I’m sure I have a photo somewhere I must look it up and see if there is something there.. The name “sheoak” I must assume is then a local name? The causariana that we have here is known locally as the “dune oak” although by no means family from the oak tree, now this is getting interesting….

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      • Ut’s listed as an ‘invasive’ species in countries including South Africa – sounds like it’s cassaurina equistifola which is I think what I’ve seen near the post office. Dune oak is one of its names 🙂 It’s not related to any other species of tree, the casarrina

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      • bulldogsturf says:

        Ok well done now I’ve been enlightened thank you, dont need to go searching through 17 000 photos to look for the tree. Have you sneaked into RSA behind my back or something…

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      • google is everyone’s friend 😀

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      • bulldogsturf says:

        Damn, if Google could just sort out my photo album, I’d be alright…

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      • Oh how frustrating!

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      • bulldogsturf says:

        I wanted to find the photos of the seeds off the trees I cut down…

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      • Wikipedia has an article on the trees, complete with a photo of the seed. Look it up and see if you recognize it – while searching for your own photo 🙂

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